Anselm Kiefer, Walhalla at White Cube: A Story Doomed To Repeat

Anselm Kiefer, Walhalla at White Cube: A Story Doomed To Repeat

The last of Wagner’s cycle of music dramas, Götterdämmerung, is a German translation of the Old Norse word Ragnarok, which in Norse mythology involves a prophesied war where Gods and heroes battle until the world is razed. The next generation are left to emerge from the ashes and resurrect their kingdom,...
How to Uncover the Art of Stockholm in a Weekend

How to Uncover the Art of Stockholm in a Weekend

Spanning fourteen islands linked by more than fifty bridges each braced by winds from the Baltic Sea, Stockholm is the most populous of all the Scandinavian cities, with a population of roughly 900,000. Lacking the art historical enamour of its Flemish and Dutch neighbours during their 17th century Golden Ages,...
Malick Sidibé's 'The Eye of Bamako' at Somerset House - The Youth of Post-Colonial Mali

Malick Sidibé’s ‘The Eye of Bamako’ at Somerset House – The Youth of Post-Colonial Mali

Through black and white images taken on a Kodak Brownie camera Sidibé captures the dawning sense of euphoria and freedom as Mali adjusts to independence. His images show kids lounging topless by the Niger River, young adults in eccentric prints doing The Twist in city squares whilst in Les Retrouvailles...
I AND ME Opens Its Shoreditch Pop Up

I AND ME Opens Its Shoreditch Pop Up

The pop-up concept has become so instilled in the retail landscape now that the opening of a new one in Shoreditch isn’t really much of a surprise – or anywhere in London, for that matter – but sometimes, just a few manage to stand out for all the right reasons....
Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them review: the magic remains

Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them review: the magic remains

Nearly five years since the last Harry Potter movie came out, JK Rowling returns with Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them, a prequel to the wizarding series that captured so many imaginations. Set in the 1920s, the only returning influence to the franchise is director David Yates, bringing the same flare and...
James Schamus interview: 'I might as well risk flopping'

James Schamus interview: ‘I might as well risk flopping’

The first thing James Schamus says when we sit down to chat is that he likes my shoes. They are a pair of slightly scuffed brown Dr. Martens – and he is wearing exactly the same ones. Whether I dress like a 57-year-old film director or he dresses like a...
Victoria Miro Mayfair hosts 'Sim' by Maria Nepomuceno

Victoria Miro Mayfair hosts ‘Sim’ by Maria Nepomuceno

As the winter nights draw in closer, the opportunity to attend the private view of the Brazilian artist Maria Nepomuceno was a delightful reprieve from the Autumnal gloom. The show features a number of beautiful new sculptures by Nepomuceno, whose work combines a plethora of artistic methods. Her work often...
The Grazing Goat, London

The Grazing Goat, London

The Cubitt House group has built itself a reputation for well designed, cosy hideaways in London and its Marylebone residence, The Grazing Goat, is no exception. Promising good food and a relaxed, retreat-like atmosphere, it’s no surprise that it’s become such a popular destination. The Hotel The wood panelled walls,...
Paris Photo - Highlights From The World's Leading Photography Fair

Paris Photo – Highlights From The World’s Leading Photography Fair

Today, Paris Photo, the world’s leading photography fair has closed its curtains for the 20th time at Grand Palais. This year’s entrants have been a noteworthy set, with 153 galleries and 30 publishers and specialised art book dealers all under one majestic glass-and-iron domed roof – the 2016 version didn’t disappoint....
Anne Fontaine interview: 'Hearing it is stronger than seeing it'

Anne Fontaine interview: ‘Hearing it is stronger than seeing it’

With the majority of director Anne Fontaine’s films having a contemporary setting, her latest offering, The Innocents, seems somewhat removed from her previous work. Despite the new period and location, however, her trademark intuitive depiction of women remains. Based on real events, the film tells the story of a group...
Hotel Nhow Milan

Hotel Nhow Milan

Among Italy’s premier cities, Milan stands on its own. Where Rome, Venice, and Florence are overwhelmingly associated with their storied histories, ancient architecture, and medieval masterpieces, Milan alone boasts a more modern sensibility. That’s not to say that the city lacks those cities’ historical pedigree, but simply that it seems...
The Innocents review: a haunting drama

The Innocents review: a haunting drama

At first glance, The Innocents seems to mark a departure from Anne Fontaine’s previous films. Set in Poland at the end of the Second World War and based on notes written by French Red Cross Doctor Madeleine Pauliac, you won’t find tumultuous love triangles or blissful beach life. And yet...
Africa My Africa - Connecting Boundaries at GAFRA

Africa My Africa – Connecting Boundaries at GAFRA

This week, the Gallery of African Art (GAFRA) in collaboration with Lahd Gallery, opened their joint exhibition, Africa My Africa – Connecting Boundaries. The show features four male artists of African heritage. The venue in Mayfair was packed with attendees, who mingled well into the night; admiring the works of...
Arrival review: unbeatably imaginative sci-fi

Arrival review: unbeatably imaginative sci-fi

Anyone watching director Denis Villeneuve’s Arrival would openly admit that this isn’t your ordinary alien invasion movie. Arrival is impressive in being just as harrowing as any other extra-terrestrial movie, but is so incredibly unlike what’s gone before it, which is what makes it exceptional. It’s a deeply thought-out narrative...
Contemporary Istanbul - The Ingredients of a Great Fair

Contemporary Istanbul – The Ingredients of a Great Fair

In the year 1970, there were a grand total of 3 art fairs happening across the globe. Fast forward to 2016 however, and we have 270. And that’s just the major ones. Contemporary Istanbul, which is now in its 11th year, is the latest in a slew of fairs to...
Nocturnal Animals review: cold and terrifying

Nocturnal Animals review: cold and terrifying

If Tom Ford’s first feature, A Single Man, was clearly the work of a fashion designer, his new offering, Nocturnal Animals, displays his real calibre as a director. Elements of his previous work remain, but they are subtler and less superfluous. Here we have a film based on Austin Wright’s...
Fera at Claridges launches new menu

Fera at Claridges launches new menu

Dining at Simon Rogan’s Fera at Claridge’s is a privilege any self-respecting foodie must savour at least once in their lifetime. Foraging and using locally sourced ingredients are words Simon Rogan made famous on his menus way back in 2002 at his famous Cumbrian restaurant, L’Enclume. Getting a table at...
Candid Favourite Moose Knuckles' UK Launch At Harrods

Candid Favourite Moose Knuckles’ UK Launch At Harrods

November is usually the turning point in the good old British climate when your transitional autumn wardrobe just can’t be stretched any further and there’s nothing else for it but hats, coats and scarves. What better time then for Moose Knuckles’s UK launch – Canada’s luxury outerwear label that is...
The Light Between Oceans review: compelling and beautiful

The Light Between Oceans review: compelling and beautiful

Although apparently having met for the first time on the dance floor of some Toronto Film Festival after party, it’s on the set of The Light Between Oceans that co-stars and now Hollywood power couple Michael Fassbender and Alicia Vikander became an item – and frankly, who could blame them? When...
The Peninsula Tokyo, Japan

The Peninsula Tokyo, Japan

Sitting amid the sleek skyscrapers of commercial district Marunouchi, The Peninsula Tokyo has an enviable location overlooking the sprawling Imperial Palace Gardens and Hibiya Park, just moments from the high-end shopping district Ginza. Within its 24 storeys, the rooms naturally command spectacular views across the skyline, but what’s inside the...
Beyond Caravaggio: Dark Matter and Salivating Detail

Beyond Caravaggio: Dark Matter and Salivating Detail

  The National Gallery’s winter blockbuster is here – and it isn’t one to miss. Beyond Caravaggio is the first major UK shows that explores the pure power that Caravaggio exerted in his works, and how this went on to influence his contemporaries in Rome, and further afield, turning Baroque...
Burn Burn Burn review: tender comedy

Burn Burn Burn review: tender comedy

Chanya Button’s directorial debut Burn Burn Burn is a dramatic comedy/road trip across the UK, covering death, friendship, and love. It’s a sweet film that could have been better executed; like a birthday card made from macaroni, it’s not perfect but it’s great for what it is. Burn Burn Burn...
Bourne & Hollingsworth, Fitzrovia

Bourne & Hollingsworth, Fitzrovia

From humble beginnings, something something something. I forget. But from Bourne & Hollingsworth’s cosy underground bar in Fitzrovia spawned a small family of venues across London. Apparently after 10 years of spreading out it was time to give the original bar a bit of love though, and Bourne & Hollingsworth...
After Love review: claustrophobic drama

After Love review: claustrophobic drama

It’s probably a little lazy of me to describe Joachim Lafosse’s After Love (L’Économie du Couple) as ‘play-like’. Not only is it lazy, but it is also an entirely unoriginal interpretation; it only takes a brief survey of the available reviews online to find the comparison numerous times already. It...
The Olive Exclusive, Windhoek

The Olive Exclusive, Windhoek

Namibia’s capital city is a curiously tidy affair at the heart of a country that is home to some of the most bizarre and dazzling landscapes on earth. Accommodation options here were once rather limited for those with a penchant for luxury, but when boutique sanctuary The Olive Exclusive swung...
Nostalgia - A Political Notion; Vanessa Albury presents Arctic, Future Relics

Nostalgia – A Political Notion; Vanessa Albury presents Arctic, Future Relics

In Vanessa Albury’s show, Arctic, Future Relics the photo-based artist weaved together carefully chosen materials to describe the concept of decline. Composed of seven art pieces on view at NURTUREart in New York between September and October, her show asked an audience to use nostalgia to reflect on the future,...
Doctor Strange review: a mind-bending Marvel

Doctor Strange review: a mind-bending Marvel

After a cityscape bending opening fight sequence teasing us with what’s to come, we settle in and meet Dr. Stephen Strange: an arrogant, ambitious, and flashy neurosurgeon who due to an accident must go on a journey of discovery. Initially hoping to find a way to heal his all-important hands,...
The Glynn Vivian Gallery in Swansea: Regeneration Done Right

The Glynn Vivian Gallery in Swansea: Regeneration Done Right

The city of Swansea in Wales isn’t the first place that springs to mind when one thinks of fine art. The industrialist town has been rather depleted on its luck in the last few decades; a decline in jobs first caused by the closure of the mines and now by...
New Opening: The Harcourt, Marylebone

New Opening: The Harcourt, Marylebone

Scandinavia has arrived in Marylebone Village. The smart, but homely vision of Andrew Endean and designer Samantha Palmer opened its front doors earlier this year, transforming two gorgeous grade-two-listed buildings into Nordic restaurant, The Harcourt. Not that you’d be able to identify the Scandi influence from the outside: the Harcourt...
Music, Sex, Drugs, Art and Politics; You Say You Want A Revolution at the V & A

Music, Sex, Drugs, Art and Politics; You Say You Want A Revolution at the V & A

The ’60s are back in a big way, and the hints are everywhere if you just know where to look. The drive to emulate a different time is not, however, something new. It is in fact a recognised reaction to times of unrest, and manifests in the adoption of trends...
The Idle Man Moves Offline

The Idle Man Moves Offline

The Idle Man, the London-based online menswear retailer that launched just two years ago, has opened its first ever store in the heart of Clerkenwell, London. Named the ‘Guide Shop’,  the latest marker in Idle’s phenomenal success offers its customers the chance to actually feel and try on the brands that...
I, Daniel Blake review: bitter benefits drama

I, Daniel Blake review: bitter benefits drama

I, Daniel Blake makes its intentions blindingly clear from its opening salvo: a fiery criticism of successive UK governments’ efforts to dismantle the country’s benefits system. The film opens on black as the credits roll, accompanied by the sound of the titular Daniel Blake (Dave Johns) undergoing an assessment for...
Shorn Launches Sparkling Wine

Shorn Launches Sparkling Wine

Sparkling wine is on the up and up (not that it was ever really down), which is good news all of us except the poor wine producers struggling to stand out from the crowd. That’s presumably where New Zealand producer Shorn (as in, like sheep) found themselves, but fear not,...
Free Fire review: inventive fun

Free Fire review: inventive fun

Ben Wheatley has kept mostly to high concept fare in his films to date, but with BFI London Film Festival closer Free Fire he’s keeping things simple: 12 men (and woman), a lot of guns, a lot of money, and a single warehouse. The setting is Boston, 1978. The IRA...
Snowden review: a little too conventional

Snowden review: a little too conventional

You don’t have to be a film buff to guess what Snowden, the latest film from Oliver Stone, is about. Edward Snowden, IT consultant and former employee of the CIA and NSA, made headlines all over the world when he leaked thousands of classified documents to the press, exposing the...
Your Name review: deserves huge admiration

Your Name review: deserves huge admiration

Your Name, Japanese director Makoto Shinkai’s latest animated feature, bubbles over with far more mirth than most of Studio Ghibli’s collection but nonetheless, comparisons have been drawn between both, as well as between him and the now retired Hayao Miyazaki. Frustratingly it’s impossible not to enter this film with every...
It's Only the End of the World review: touching and explosive

It’s Only the End of the World review: touching and explosive

All families are dysfunctional. But this is a Xavier Dolan family – and therefore about as dysfunctional as they get. It’s Only the End of the World is 27-year-old Dolan’s sixth feature, and, if he proved his maturity with Mommy, his most recent film shows he is definitely here for...
Shangri-La Hotel, Paris

Shangri-La Hotel, Paris

Fusing lavish French heritage with exquisite Asian influence and some of the best Eiffel Tower views in the capital, Shangri-La Hotel Paris is as visually stunning as it is luxurious. It’s this along with exemplary service, Michelin-starred cuisine, and now the newly launched Le Bar Botaniste, that proves the hotel...
The Autopsy of Jane Doe review: masterful horror

The Autopsy of Jane Doe review: masterful horror

After shocking us with the unmissable, one-of-a-kind Troll Hunter, Norwegian director André Øvredal has become a talent you want to keep a close eye on. His new feature The Autopsy of Jane Doe is debuting at the London Film Festival as the Cult gala, and rewards that close attention. While the...
Björk Digital at Somerset House - What Does a Broken Heart Look Like?

Björk Digital at Somerset House – What Does a Broken Heart Look Like?

What does a broken heart look like? What does it sound like, dress like, feel like? Only Björk, the Icelandic singer-songwriter cum performance artist, who shot to fame with All So Quiet back in the nineties, could attempt to aestheticize the intimacies of her personal life. ‘Björk Digital’ currently on...
Kano: Made In The Manor at Brixton Academy

Kano: Made In The Manor at Brixton Academy

In a grainy home video from 2004 that was later distributed from car boots around East London as the first “Lord of the Mics” DVD, we see a baby faced Kano alongside an equally youthful-looking Wiley battle it out on a stairwell, spitting their lyrics with fierce determination to a...
New Opening: Pitt Cue, Liverpool Street

New Opening: Pitt Cue, Liverpool Street

The meteoric rise of Pitt Cue from food truck under Hungerford Bridge on the Southbank serving pulled pork in takeaway boxes at £7 each to their shiny, 100 plus cover restaurant in the heart of the Liverpool Street with a centrepiece US-made bespoke grill costing $89,000 is the kind of...
Pedro Paricio and Halcyon Gallery - Pop Meets Dreamy Surrealism

Pedro Paricio and Halcyon Gallery – Pop Meets Dreamy Surrealism

Pedro Paricio is a Spanish artist hailing from Tenerife, who has been creeping up on the contemporary painting scene in recent years, with great acclaim. After finishing an education in Fine Arts at art school in Barcelona, Paricio embarked on a series of global shows, including a solo exhibition at...
La La Land review: sure to be a classic

La La Land review: sure to be a classic

It’s satisfying just to see Emma Stone and Ryan Gosling tap dance whilst simultaneously looking for their cars on the gargantuan Hollywood Hills really, but this is far from the highlight of Damien Chazelle’s latest film. The success of his last, Whiplash, placed considerable and not unwarranted expectation on La La...
Brian Gleeson interview: 'the character relies on the dialogue'

Brian Gleeson interview: ‘the character relies on the dialogue’

Tiger Raid is the debut film by upcoming director and screenwriter Simon Dixon and follows the story of two Irish mercenaries Joe (Brian Gleeson) and Paddy (Damien Moloney) who are travelling the deserts of Iraq with orders to kidnap an Iraqi woman. With the film out this week, we spoke to...
Moonlight review: completely absorbing

Moonlight review: completely absorbing

My first question on coming out of Moonlight was: who is Barry Jenkins? Who made this beautiful, completely absorbing, and perfectly cast film about a young man growing up gay and in poverty in Miami? From the get-go the cinematography shows the confusion and instability of the world we’re entering....
Spotlight on Kallos Gallery at Frieze Masters

Spotlight on Kallos Gallery at Frieze Masters

  With a dazzling  premises on Davies Street in Mayfair, Kallos gallery announced itself with a big fanfare a just two years ago, hoping to blow away the cobwebs from the creaky doors and knock “ring for entry” signs off of the stuffy world of antiquities. Specialising in Ancient Greek...
My Scientology Movie review: Louis Theroux breaks the formula

My Scientology Movie review: Louis Theroux breaks the formula

Across his body of work as a documentarian, Louis Theroux has covered a vast array of topics, groups and points of view, but there have been two simple constants: first, his chosen method, to enter groups, families and organisations to get to know the people involved on a personal level;...
What to do with Drambuie

What to do with Drambuie

Drambuie’s one of those drinks, right? You’ve seen it around the back of a bar. You’ve heard the name, maybe spotted it on the shelf along the Tesco booze aisle. It’s instantly familiar, but you somehow can’t quite place it. It’s a sort of whiskey thing, yeah? Scotch-y? Alcoholic? The...
A United Kingdom review: unapologetically heartwarming

A United Kingdom review: unapologetically heartwarming

A United Kingdom is filled with moments of deep, brittle, and slow-burning tension, as it explores the intertwining of race, class, politics, and love, in a story based on true events in the years following the Second World War. Namely the swift love affair and marriage of Ruth Williams (Rosamund...
War on Everyone review: mixed laughs

War on Everyone review: mixed laughs

Does a mime make a sound when you hit him with a car? This and other questions you’ve never asked are answered over the course of War on Everyone, the third film from director John Michael McDonagh. After sticking with rural Ireland for previous efforts The Guard and Calvary, he’s...
New Opening: QP Lounge, Mayfair

New Opening: QP Lounge, Mayfair

Quattro Passi, the famous Italian outpost on Dover Street in Mayfair of the two Michelin-starred restaurant of the same name in Nerano, Italy has been going through a slick rebranding and relaunch of late. The ground floor restaurant is now known as QP LDN, whilst the basement has been relaunched...
An Interview with Touria El Glaoui, founder of 1:54 Contemporary African Art Fair

An Interview with Touria El Glaoui, founder of 1:54 Contemporary African Art Fair

Africa is a vast and multifarious continent where authoritarian regimes coexist with functioning democracies. It’s a melting pot of civilisations, traditions and art and despite the social and political instability rife in many countries; the cultural exchange taking place in the nexus of Africa is undeniable. “The global reception of...
Grand Hotel Tremezzo - True Dolce Vita

Grand Hotel Tremezzo – True Dolce Vita

Lake Como is undoubtedly the most famous of all the Italian lakes, and probably thanks to a certain espresso swigging silver fox who goes by the name of George Clooney. He has put Como on the map for Americans, making it much more popular with our neighbours from across the...
Rachel Maclean - Sugar-Sickly Scottish Video Art at HOME, Manchester

Rachel Maclean – Sugar-Sickly Scottish Video Art at HOME, Manchester

HOME Manchester is adding another explosion of a show to its roster, this time in the form of Scotland’s Rachel Maclean. The gallery, which opened in 2015, has already been as a beacon for boundary pushing – defiantly displaying some of the most provocative art the UK is currently producing....
Free State of Jones review: squandered promise

Free State of Jones review: squandered promise

This American Civil War drama is blessed with an intriguing real-life figure as its subject, yet squanders its promise with a meandering narrative and some troubling racial politics. Starring Matthew McConaughey, Free State of Jones tells the remarkable story of farmer Newton ‘Newt’ Knight, who defected from the army and...
Under the Shadow review: strips horror back to the basics

Under the Shadow review: strips horror back to the basics

In a genre that has a reputation for endlessly pursuing gore, using violence and bloodshed as shortcuts for real scares, Under the Shadow is a welcome surprise. Across the film’s scant 84 minutes there’s hardly a drop of blood shed, and nobody is dismembered, maimed, or separated from their innards....
At the Chapel, Somerset

At the Chapel, Somerset

Hidden amid the hedgerows and hills of Somerset, Bruton doesn’t come into sight until you’re among the town’s ancient spires. Yet, Bruton has long drawn a discerning crowd of creatives, including literary great John Steinbeck. The 2008 opening of design-forward hotel At the Chapel, and subsequent arrival of arts hub...
Swiss Army Man review: 'a triumph'

Swiss Army Man review: ‘a triumph’

Possibly referred to as the Daniel-Radcliffe-farting-corpse-movie, Swiss Army Man comes from the screenwriting and directorial hands of the Daniels Kwan and Scheiner, and is the duo’s first feature length film. Swiss Army Man concerns Hank (Paul Dano), a young man inexplicably marooned on a deserted island somewhere in the Pacific....
London Cocktail Week 2016: The Woodford Alliance

London Cocktail Week 2016: The Woodford Alliance

One of the main highlights of this year’s upcoming London Cocktail Week is The Woodford Alliance; presented by Woodford Reserve, it involves six leading bars from across the globe over the course of three nights. Woodford Reserve is a super-premium craft bourbon, made from one of America’s oldest and smallest...
Food for thought? Lucy + Jorge Orta: Food, at City Gallery, Peterborough

Food for thought? Lucy + Jorge Orta: Food, at City Gallery, Peterborough

Lucy +Jorge Orta are the sort of socially conscious artists the world needs more of. Their collaborative practice examines the issues that challenge the 21st century’s population; migration crises, water-pollution, plant and animal extinction, food waste – the list goes on. Based in a Parisian converted paper mill that is...
Ira Sachs interview: 'I'm a troubled American'

Ira Sachs interview: ‘I’m a troubled American’

If Ira Sachs has settled into a niche, it’s clearly a comfortable one. And if he keeps making films like Love Is Strange and Little Men, I think we’d best just leave him there for now. Together with writing partner Mauricio Zacharias, the director is drawing on his own life...
A Weekend in Ibiza

A Weekend in Ibiza

Ibiza is one of those bucket list places you are keen to tick off, but never sure if it is in fact your dream destination for that quick weekend getaway. Are there too many fellow British tourists? Are prices exorbitant? Is it just about nightclubs and dance music? Getting there...
The Magnificent Seven review: a film of two halves

The Magnificent Seven review: a film of two halves

The old saying goes that if it ain’t broke, don’t fix it. Ben-Hur, anyone? Not content to let sleeping dogs lie, Antoine Fuqua follows prevailing winds currently battering screens all over the world by remaking John Sturges’ 1960 Steve McQueen/Yul Brynner classic The Magnificent Seven, itself a Hollywood iteration of...
The Infinite Mix – Contemporary Sound and Image at Hayward Gallery; The Strand

The Infinite Mix – Contemporary Sound and Image at Hayward Gallery; The Strand

Since the Hayward Gallery closed its doors on Southbank for a two year renovation, there seems to have been a lack of exciting contemporary art projects in London. Nothing that has reached the enjoyment levels of Carsten Höller’s carnival of rides and automata has really happened; everything has all felt...
Little Men review: quietly challenging

Little Men review: quietly challenging

The most quietly devastating moment in Little Men, Ira Sachs’ latest, features little more than a young teenager rollerblading through the Bronx, alone. We’ve seen Jake Jardine (Theo Taplitz) skate this same route twice before – but each time in the company of his unlikely friend Tony Calvelli (Michael Barbieri)....
Paths of Glory Blu-ray review: classic Kubrick

Paths of Glory Blu-ray review: classic Kubrick

At first glance, you might be surprised to note that Paths of Glory is a Kubrick film. At just 90 minutes it’s one of his shortest films, shot and edited with an unfamiliar economy. As Richard Ayoade notes in one of the interviews accompanying this Masters of Cinema Blu-ray release,...
Their Finest review: a bittersweet wartime tale

Their Finest review: a bittersweet wartime tale

This is another successful film from director Lone Scherfig (An Education), who has adapted Lissa Evans’s book Their Finest Hour and an Half with elegance and talent. Set predominantly in London during the Second World War and in the midst of the Blitz, Their Finest focuses on a film production...
Incidents of Travel in the Multiverse – HOME in Manchester, Pushing the Boundaries

Incidents of Travel in the Multiverse – HOME in Manchester, Pushing the Boundaries

HOME, Manchester’s international centre for contemporary visual art, film and theatre, is the epicentre of the city’s creative hub. Opened in 2015 as the fusion space of Library Theatre Company and Cornerhouse, it provides a home for Manchester’s creatives. Part cinema, part gallery, part theatre, part were not quite sure...
The Almodóvar Collection Blu-ray review: an inimitable selection

The Almodóvar Collection Blu-ray review: an inimitable selection

Pedro Almodóvar has a daunting 34 directorial credits on IMDb across four decades of work. Trim out the shorts and oddities, and you’re still left with an astonishing 20 feature films from 1980 through to this year’s Julieta, all of which have contributed to his claim to be Spain’s most...
Glenlivet's Limited Edition Cipher Scotch

Glenlivet’s Limited Edition Cipher Scotch

The Glenlivet Cipher is, as the name might suggest, a bit of a mystery. This limited edition run of single malt scotch is delivered in an opaque black bottle, bereft of the tasting notes that so many of us love to read, nod wisely at, and use to pretend we...
Sing review: marvellous musical medley

Sing review: marvellous musical medley

From the makers of Minions and Despicable Me, with a plot inspired whilst enjoying a pot of tea, comes the musical medley Sing. It’s a movie that stirs a sense of self-determination, sacrifice, taking bold decisions in life, and doing whatever it takes to succeed no matter the challenge. For...
Fluxland - A Floating Centre to Inspire Debate on the Thames

Fluxland – A Floating Centre to Inspire Debate on the Thames

This month, a new conceptual work by the artist Cyril de Commarque floats down the Thames. The artwork takes the form of a barge, covered in angular mirrors – a floating sculpture that acts as stage for performance, interaction and debate. The 25 metre long former freight boat that has...
Kerb Camden Market

Kerb Camden Market

Kerb have become one of London’s prime purveyors of gourmet street food, gathering together an assortment of stalls offering fusion foods and deep-fried delights across the capital. Their latest venture sees them take on a pretty tough market though: quite literally, in fact, as Kerb has opened just shop in...
The Infiltrator review: Cranston is a true film star

The Infiltrator review: Cranston is a true film star

Bryan Cranston’s latest vehicle sees him once again embroiled in the illegal drug trade, although this time on the legal side of the law. A real-life tale of money-laundering and undercover agents, The Infiltrator stars Cranston as Robert Mazur, a US Customs officer who realises that the key to winning...
Hunt for the Wilderpeople review: warm, witty, and relentlessly entertaining

Hunt for the Wilderpeople review: warm, witty, and relentlessly entertaining

New Zealand’s Taika Waititi is in the midst of a major career transition, from the low budget likes of Eagle vs Shark and What We Do in the Shadows to next year’s massive Marvel epic Thor: Ragnarok. It’s no surprise then that there’s renewed attention on his latest release, Hunt...
Dubrovnik - Europe's Hip and New Art Capital

Dubrovnik – Europe’s Hip and New Art Capital

Croatia, for several years now, has been the hippest European destination for the younger crowds. It’s turquoise seas; UNESCO world heritage towns and vibrant arts and culture make it a great destination for both a hectic weekend city break, and the relaxing beach trip. The city of Dubrovnik is perhaps...
Blair Witch review: relentlessly terrifying

Blair Witch review: relentlessly terrifying

When it was announced that director Adam Wingard and writer Simon Barrett were working on a new horror film titled The Woods, horror fans were rightly excited. This was the pair responsible for You’re Next and The Guest, after all, and they’d comfortably proven they were talents to watch. Many...
The Man Who Fell to Earth review: a showcase for Bowie

The Man Who Fell to Earth review: a showcase for Bowie

It’s one of those curious quirks of fate that the year of David Bowie’s death would align so neatly with major anniversaries of a few of his most notable cinematic works. We’ve already had the 30th anniversaries of both Labyrinth and the underrated Absolute Beginners, and we can no doubt...
London Design Biennale – Utopia by Design at Somerset House

London Design Biennale – Utopia by Design at Somerset House

Opening this week, the first ever London Design Biennale launches at London’s Somerset House. 37 countries spanning 6 continents have pitched their pavilions, representing the foremost design by architects, scientists, artists and writers. Spread throughout the building, each pavilion offers visitors the chance to interact with brand new works, examining...
Green Bar Debuts Givenchy Cocktails

Green Bar Debuts Givenchy Cocktails

The iconic Hotel Café Royal has embarked on a new and intriguing venture with none other than fashion house Givenchy in its alluring Green Bar, a stone’s throw from the parade of haute couture on Bond Street. The Green Bar lives up to its name, with booth-style seating set against...
Hell or High Water review: 'a mesmerising modern western'

Hell or High Water review: ‘a mesmerising modern western’

This mesmerising modern western in the Cormac McCarthy mould has Chris Pine and Ben Foster as two brothers on a crime spree with more to it than meets the eye, whilst Jeff Bridges is the shrewd old Texas Ranger who, a few days from retirement, gets obsessed with taking them...
Luke Cage TV review: dares to be quiet

Luke Cage TV review: dares to be quiet

There’s an easy trap to fall into with sequels and spin-offs. Everything has to be bigger, brighter, louder than whatever came before, to make more noise and show off more spectacle, as if that’s what it takes to justify its place in the world. You’d probably forgive Luke Cage for...
Kubo and the Two Strings review: exquisite

Kubo and the Two Strings review: exquisite

“If you must blink, do it now.” So opens Kubo and the Two Strings, and it’s hard to think of a more apt opening. Get all your blinking out of the way, because you won’t want to miss a frame of the exquisitely animated, heartbreakingly powerful latest from Laika. The...
Staycation: The Laslett, Notting Hill

Staycation: The Laslett, Notting Hill

The Hotel The Laslett takes up five snow-white town houses on the smart street of Pembridge Gardens, which, as those familiar with the area will know, is more than lavish in the pricey neighbourhood of Notting Hill. It’s by no means flashy though; The Laslett is a hotel that prides...
David Mackenzie interview: 'I think I’m getting better at making movies'

David Mackenzie interview: ‘I think I’m getting better at making movies’

David Mackenzie is hardly new to the film industry, releasing his debut feature, The Last Great Wilderness, back in 2002. But many will have discovered him only a few years ago with the explosive prison drama Starred Up, which starred Jack O’Connell as a young offender graduated to the same...
Sausage Party review: funny but forgettable

Sausage Party review: funny but forgettable

Seth Rogen has admitted he smokes weed to aid his creative process, which might explain the likes of This Is the End, a movie where he hangs out with his real life buddies smoking weed. It’s certainly no surprise to learn that’s how animated adventure Sausage Party came about, a movie that’s basically Toy Story with food and about...
Restaurant Review: Prithvi, Cheltenham

Restaurant Review: Prithvi, Cheltenham

Sitting pretty on the western edge of the Cotswolds, just a mere two hours’ drive from London, the smart regency town of Cheltenham has undergone somewhat of a revival over the past five years with the openings of Lucky Onion’s hip boutique hotels No 131 and No 38 The Park,...
An interview with South African Graphic Artist Jamy van Zyl

An interview with South African Graphic Artist Jamy van Zyl

Jamy van Zyl’s art is one that truly speaks to the soul. He reconnects disparate youthful desires and manias, and his art is not only aesthetically pleasing but allows the gap of personal experience to be bridged, and encourages true flavour to flourish. His pains and joys are so evident...
Things to Come review: Isabelle Huppert is a marvel

Things to Come review: Isabelle Huppert is a marvel

Saying a lot with very little is the mark of a truly great actor: non-verbal communication, underplaying emotion, using stillness and economy of gesture efficiently, talking in whispers when a scream is expected. Able to convey crippling fragility, fear, fury and fervour in the blink of an eye, there is...
Grime Returns: Red Bull Music Academy Presents: Dizzee Rascal’s Boy In Da Corner

Grime Returns: Red Bull Music Academy Presents: Dizzee Rascal’s Boy In Da Corner

  If Wiley is the God Father of grime, then Dizzee Rascal is the original prodigal son. Bow’s very own, Dizzee rose to fame while a fresh-faced 18 year old youth for his genre defying debut album Boy In Da Corner that won him the Mercury Music Prize. Nothing quite...
Café Society review: vintage Woody Allen

Café Society review: vintage Woody Allen

A great Woody Allen film is a bit of a treat these days. It feels like a special occasion, like opening a Christmas present from an aunt and discovering that for once she actually got you something you want. Allen’s track record has been spotty of late, though with undeniable...
Hotel Miramar, Barcelona

Hotel Miramar, Barcelona

On the eastern side of Barcelona’s Montjuïc hill is a steep cliff, offering a commanding panorama of the city. It is also the setting of an artistically restored palace, Hotel Miramar. The Hotel Steeped in Catalan history, Hotel Miramar’s building was originally a royal endeavour. First designed and built in...
An Interview With David Shirley, About Flying Tiger Copenhagen

An Interview With David Shirley, About Flying Tiger Copenhagen

The chain of high street shops known at Tiger, are the purveyors of all things fun, kitsch and affordable – experts at making you buy things you never knew you needed or wanted, but that definitely make you smile. They are going through a rebrand at the moment, soon to...
Sid and Nancy Blu-ray review: abrasive punk biopic

Sid and Nancy Blu-ray review: abrasive punk biopic

The spirit of punk runs rife through Sid and Nancy, a film that’s about as abrasive as the Sex Pistols themselves, and similarly inconsistent in quality. The film picks up in 1977, with the legendary punk band at the height of their fame (though not necessarily fortune). Bassist Sid Vicious is...
The Purge: Election Year review: timely horror

The Purge: Election Year review: timely horror

Whether meticulously planned or merely coincidental, the release of the third chapter in The Purge franchise couldn’t be more timely and relevant. Despite being a genre flick and often falling victim to the pitfalls of mindless entertainment, writer/director James DeMonaco’s attempt at sociopolitical commentary as the premise of a horror...
Alyn Williams at the Westbury

Alyn Williams at the Westbury

Industry leading chefs don’t tend to mention their past job experiences, as they prefer to focus on their present ventures. However, it is often handy to discover their past to understand the culmination of their style of cooking. Alyn Williams has been a much-loved part of the London culinary scene...
Antarctic Biennale – Art for Humanity in Frozen Lands

Antarctic Biennale – Art for Humanity in Frozen Lands

Launched in February 2016, the Antarctic Biennale is a new intercultural and interdisciplinary platform, for artists from across the world to come together, and explore one of the last expanses of uninhabited land through creativity. By placing the participants within an extreme environment, they have limited resources, outside interaction, confined...
Insider's Guide to Los Angeles

Insider’s Guide to Los Angeles

The City of Angels has a bit of a soured reputation in some circles when it comes to travel. A few too many people have hoped to visit the gleaming streets of Hollywood and found it instead slightly dishevelled – the walk of fame just that bit grimier than they...
Popstar: Never Stop Never Stopping review: crude and crass

Popstar: Never Stop Never Stopping review: crude and crass

Midway through Popstar: Never Stop Never Stopping Andy Samberg’s global superstar Conner4Real is on a Europe-wide tour to promote his atrocious new album when he makes a stop at the Anne Frank house in Amsterdam. Here, he drops the kids off at the pool in a bathroom which is part...
Nordic Painting: Re-establishing the Importance of Nordic Art

Nordic Painting: Re-establishing the Importance of Nordic Art

Two female art historians have made it their mission to help raise the profile of Nordic art to its rightful place alongside the long-lauded paintings and sculpture coming from France, Italy, Spain and Britain during the 19th and 20th centuries. Katherina Alsen, a visiting research fellow at Copenhagen University, and...
Restaurant Review: Percy & Founders, Fitzrovia

Restaurant Review: Percy & Founders, Fitzrovia

Hidden away in Fitzrovia lies Percy and Founders, a sleek all-day dining spot in the former site of the Middlesex hospital, which has undergone a reformation in recent years. More brasserie than public house, the smart restaurant echoes the style of the modern apartments that surround it, while making a...
The Childhood of a Leader review: rattlingly ambitious

The Childhood of a Leader review: rattlingly ambitious

What does it take to create a dictator? That’s the question posed by The Childhood of a Leader, which explores the youth of an American boy transposed to 1918 Paris for the negotiation of World War I reparations, querying along the way what might lead to the rise of European...
David Brent: Life on the Road review: embarrassing

David Brent: Life on the Road review: embarrassing

Whereas beloved British sitcoms making the transition from the small screen to the big used to be cheaply assembled excuses to over-extend the joke on a higher budget, there’s been a recent resurgence in their popularity. Whether it’s Mrs. Brown’s Boys D’Movie or more recently Absolutely Fabulous: The Movie, this sudden...
Jaco Van Dormael interview: 'I hope that I never become God'

Jaco Van Dormael interview: ‘I hope that I never become God’

Acclaimed director Jaco Van Dormael’s latest film The Brand New Testament is a departure from his usual fare, drifting from drama to comedy. However, it lacks no less meaning or depth than his past works. We were fortunate enough to have Jaco take some time out of his busy schedule...
Georgia O’Keeffe at the Tate Modern - Breaking Free From Gender Politics

Georgia O’Keeffe at the Tate Modern – Breaking Free From Gender Politics

Georgia O’Keeffe radically broke from tradition and this summer the Tate celebrates the artist and pioneer of American abstraction that remains absent from British collections in an enthralling retrospective. The exhibition marks the centenary of O’Keeffe’s first show at Alfred Stieglitz’s 291 gallery, presenting themes of the private, erotic and...
Pulitzer Amsterdam

Pulitzer Amsterdam

Oh Amsterdam, how you seduce us. Your chocolate box townhouses, your narrow waterways and your statuesque bike-riding inhabitants… the list goes on. Or at least it did, until Pulitzer Amsterdam reopened its doors and floored us completely. The Hotel Shine your shoes and straighten your bow tie because there’s something...
The Childhood of a Leader - exclusive clip

The Childhood of a Leader – exclusive clip

The Childhood of a Leader is a curious one. The directorial debut of acclaimed actor Brady Corbet, it details the post-WWI childhood of a fictionalized future European dictator, using the backdrop of the Versailles Treaty to explore both family dynamics and the nature of power. It’s all driven by a...
Todd Solondz interview: 'The dog is just dumb'

Todd Solondz interview: ‘The dog is just dumb’

Wiener-Dog, writer-director Todd Solondz’s eighth feature film, is not about a dog–wiener or otherwise. Or at least that’s what he insisted, repeatedly, when we met during the Sundance London film festival, where the film enjoyed its UK premiere earlier this year. Sure, there’s a dog in the title. And on...
The Shallows review: 'phenomenal fun'

The Shallows review: ‘phenomenal fun’

This shark thriller transposes the B-movie creature feature into the 21st century with style, delivering a slice of thrilling, bloody fun with the ability to impress and shock in equal measure. The Shallows, directed by Spanish filmmaker Jaume Collet-Sera (House of Wax, Orphan), sells a simple yet tantalising package of...
Brighton – The Capital of Cool, What Not To Miss Now

Brighton – The Capital of Cool, What Not To Miss Now

Brighton has always been known as a city for the arts. It’s windy streets and cobbled lanes are dotted with boutique galleries and independent craft shops. It feels like the home of a free spirit, do-it-yourself mentality to arts – almost the antithesis of the London world of auction houses,...
Nerve review: a firm 'Like'

Nerve review: a firm ‘Like’

Nerve, based on the novel by Jeanne Ryan, is essentially an online reality videogame of ‘truth or dare’ without the ‘truth’. The game sees participants move up levels from one dangerous dare to the next, in return for cash prizes and notoriety. Emma Robert’s Vee (short for Venus), joins the...
Hotel Cotton House, Barcelona

Hotel Cotton House, Barcelona

From the chaos of the Gran Via into an oasis of calm; stepping into the Cotton House Hotel, you’ll find a hidden gem tucked away in Barcelona’s city centre. A listed 19th century landmark designed by Catalan architect Elies Rogent, this grand Neoclassical mansion used to be the headquarters of the...
Graphic Artist Ben Eine at Casa Havana pop-up in London

Graphic Artist Ben Eine at Casa Havana pop-up in London

A two-week long Cuban-themed pop up is about to take residency in Soho, organised by the classic Cuban rum creators, Havana Club, which will explore the highlights of Cuban culture through the three godly pillars of food, music and colour. It’s a little known fact that Havana Club is the...
Pete's Dragon review: mythical and magical

Pete’s Dragon review: mythical and magical

The old adage may be that dog is a man’s best friend, but for a boy left lost, alone and frightened in a northern wilderness a kindly, protective dragon makes for an effective substitute. Full of the mythical adventure and magical spirit that allows for kids of all ages to...
Suicide Squad review: 'an utter mess'

Suicide Squad review: ‘an utter mess’

Never underestimate the value of a really good trailer. In the span of two and a half minutes they can turn a mediocre blockbuster into an epic to rival Lawrence of Arabia, and even resoundingly weak efforts like Transformers: Dark of the Moon or Terminator Salvation lured in audiences with the help of well-cut previews. Similarly the...
Hip Hopp: Dennis Hopper, Protest, and Popular Music

Hip Hopp: Dennis Hopper, Protest, and Popular Music

  This is an edited excerpt from Create or Die: Essays on the Artistry of Dennis Hopper, a new book by Stephen Lee Naish published by Amsterdam University Press. One may not consider actor and director Dennis Hopper to be a savvy musical genius. Apart from his early associations with Bob Dylan,...
Imperial War Museum Contemporary Presents: Edward Barber – Peace Signs

Imperial War Museum Contemporary Presents: Edward Barber – Peace Signs

The Imperial War Museum in South London is staging its latest contemporary show focusing on the 1980s anti-nuclear movement in Britain, as seen through the lense of the photographer Edward Barber. Bringing together over 40 photographs, the exhibition reinterprets the body of work Barber created while documenting some of the...
Pavilion Wine opens in Chelsea

Pavilion Wine opens in Chelsea

Buying wine is all very well and good, but there’s a major downside to popping into your local wine shop or off-licence: they don’t tend to like it very much when you sit down in the shop and crack your newly purchased bottle open. That’s a problem that Pavilion Wine,...
Up for Love review: chemistry without a spark

Up for Love review: chemistry without a spark

Jean Dujardin’s post-Oscar career hasn’t been as fruitful as we might have hoped for him. He may have worked with Martin Scorsese since then, but this French rom-com is hardly a good showcase for the talents he demonstrated with his awards-laden performance in The Artist. In Up for Love (a...
Town House launches Sunday lunch in Kensington

Town House launches Sunday lunch in Kensington

With both Sunday brunch and afternoon tea proving such enduring trends within luxury hotels, there often isn’t much room left for Sunday lunch. But this is exactly what’s on offer at Town House, the elegant restaurant that sits comfortably within The Kensington. We’re not talking about your typical Sunday fare,...
Born to Be Blue review: an ambitious biopic

Born to Be Blue review: an ambitious biopic

“Who’s better, Miles Davis or me?” asks Chet Baker, the legendary jazz player, to a group of ecstatic fans waiting for him outside the bar where he’s scheduled to play. And then he’s on stage, and he kills it: his version of ‘Let’s Get Lost’ is impeccable. The audience loves...
Yuri Pattison; User, Space, at East London's Chisenhale Gallery

Yuri Pattison; User, Space, at East London’s Chisenhale Gallery

Flexible offices are the future. Co-working spaces have become so popular amongst freelancers and tech entrepreneurs within East London’s, ‘Silicon Roundabout’ that the Capital now has the highest number of them than anywhere else in the world. Collaborative workspaces such as WeWork, Second Home and even Soho House boast arcades,...
Finding Dory review: witty, warm, and wonderful

Finding Dory review: witty, warm, and wonderful

For better or worse, Pixar is in the sequel game these days.. Out of 17 feature films thus far, only five have been prequels or sequels — but four of those have come in the years since 2010. Finding Dory comes after a welcome break of two entirely original entries...
Absolute Beginners Bluray review: musical surrealism

Absolute Beginners Bluray review: musical surrealism

At points this year it’s felt as if everything started to go wrong after David Bowie died in January: a wave of other celebrity deaths followed, while in the political sphere we suffered Donald Trump’s seemingly unstoppable rise, while the UK was splintered by the Brexit referendum. And the weather’s...
SPLEEN: An Artist Run Curatorial Project in London

SPLEEN: An Artist Run Curatorial Project in London

SPLEEN is a new artist run curatorial project that is taking over a some of London’s more unusual gallery spaces and running a series of exhibitions to showcase the cities most talented artists. Combining visual art and performance art, the group stage short shows that seem to burst out of...
Star Trek Beyond review: shoots for the stars

Star Trek Beyond review: shoots for the stars

Ever since JJ Abrams introduced his semi-rebooted series of Star Trek films, there’s been a lot of talk about what makes Trek, well, Trek. That first film, some fans argued, wasn’t Trek-ky enough, perhaps relying too much on big action beats and glossy effects, and not enough on the philosophising...
Barnsley House Hotel & Spa, Cotswolds

Barnsley House Hotel & Spa, Cotswolds

The Hotel Barnsley House is set within a 17th century manor house – one of the very prettiest, grand but on a manageable scale so you feel at ease walking through the door in jeans and trainers. The rural, Cotswolds village of Barnsley feels a million miles away from the chaos of...
Up for Love - exclusive clip

Up for Love – exclusive clip

Up for Love sees The Artist‘s Jean Dujardin back on screen in a new French rom-com with a small surprise to it. When Dujardin’s Alexandre finds a phone belonging to Diane (Virginie Efira) he manages to charm her into going on a date with him. Except she’s a bit surprised to...
Louis Vuitton Fragrance To Launch This Autumn

Louis Vuitton Fragrance To Launch This Autumn

The first Louis Vuitton fragrance in over 70 years will launch this September, the iconic fashion house has revealed. Although the scent, bottle and specific launch details are still very much under wraps, a few clues hint at the finished product on the French luxury brand’s website. It will be a...
Justin Bieber Purpose Tour Merch: Baby, Baby, Baby, No.

Justin Bieber Purpose Tour Merch: Baby, Baby, Baby, No.

This morning, Barney’s New York opened its doors, not to those keen to shop their summer sale first or to get to the pre-fall Gucci drop, but to throngs of eager fans of a certain Canadian superstar. They have their eye on one thing: Justin Bieber Purpose Tour merch (that’s 2016 for...
Amsterdam – The City of Creative Europe

Amsterdam – The City of Creative Europe

Holland, more than any other Northern European country, is known for its sublime output of art. When imagining the stereotypical encounters faced when visiting the Dutch country, art (along with maybe tulips and coffee shops) is what comes to mind. None of its Nordic neighbours are known so explicitly for...
Summertime review: heated but unambitious

Summertime review: heated but unambitious

Having mined the emotional unrest brought about from a range of typically adult circumstances in her previous films, be they betrayals of the heart or one’s moral fortitude, French writer-director Catherine Corsini makes a decidedly monotone return with sun-soaked romantic drama Summertime. Something of a febrile blend of Abtellatif Kechiche’s...
Restaurant Review: Patron Cave a Manger

Restaurant Review: Patron Cave a Manger

Patron Cave à Manger, located in the up and coming Kentish Town area, transforms North London into a French neighbourhood. Offering dinner Tuesday through to Sunday (with lunch on Friday to Sunday) and a hot-off-the-press brunch menu on weekends, there is plenty to enjoy at this chic French bistro. You...
The Hard Stop review: a hard-fought documentary

The Hard Stop review: a hard-fought documentary

After premiering at the Toronto International Film Festival in September 2015, The Hard Stop comes to UK cinemas and brings with it an unflinching and sharp look at the circumstances surrounding the shooting of Mark Duggan, and the people and communities affected. Duggan was shot and killed on August 4th...
Ghostbusters review: winning fun

Ghostbusters review: winning fun

When reviewing a movie it’s important to try and tune out the pre-release hype or controversies that might surround it, and judge it on its own merits. That’s tricky with this new version of Ghostbusters for two reasons. Firstly, it’s a remake of a beloved comedy whose iconography is embedded in pop culture; even if people...
Lee Bull's Supper Club at Vintage Salt

Lee Bull’s Supper Club at Vintage Salt

One of the chief architects of the success of Caprice Holdings must include Lee Bull, who has worked as head chef at Scott’s, Le Caprice and in different capacities at all the Caprice portfolio restaurants. When we heard he was running a weekly supper club at Vintage Salt, which would...
Martin Creed – What You Find, at Hauser and Wirth Somerset

Martin Creed – What You Find, at Hauser and Wirth Somerset

Martin Creed is a man who divides opinion. From being lambasted as the worst ever Turner Prize winner by Times art critic Waldemar Januszczak, to becoming the poster boy of art world leader Ivan Wirth, he certainly knows how to cause a bit of controversy. He gained notoriety for his...
McQueen launches alfresco terrace in Shoreditch

McQueen launches alfresco terrace in Shoreditch

It’s rare to see the chain of reasoning leading up to a design decision as clearly as one can at McQueen in Shoreditch. McQueen is named after the late actor Steve McQueen. Steve McQueen quite famously liked cars and motorcycles. Nice cars and motorcycles often have quite a lot of...
Daydreaming with Stanley Kubrick

Daydreaming with Stanley Kubrick

Stanley Kubrick has had an almost unmatched influence on cinema in his long career. From his first major feature, 1956’s The Killing, through to his last, 1999’s Eyes Wide Shut, Kubrick’s distinctive style, creative rigour, and varied subject matter led to some of the greatest films ever made. Without the...
Obonjan – The New Type of Curated Arts Festival

Obonjan – The New Type of Curated Arts Festival

Croatia has gained momentum in the last decade as a place to go for festivals. With over twenty to choose from in 2016 alone, new kid on the scene, “Obonjan” has found a unique approach as to how to draw in the crowds. This idyllic island, surrounded by crystal blue...
Maggie's Plan review: implausibly plausible

Maggie’s Plan review: implausibly plausible

Maggie’s Plan is made up of moments of cringe worthy implausibility and cliché which somehow coexist with moments of cringe worthy realness, of true human connection, however icky they seem, perhaps because they feel too near, too true. These moments are also surprising, existing as they do in an aesthetically...
The Neon Demon review: grotesquely beautiful

The Neon Demon review: grotesquely beautiful

There’s a certain irony in seeing Danish director Nicolas Winding Refn tackle the fashion industry head on. His films are driven by their singular aesthetic and, according to his critics, betray an obsession with style over substance, stirring visuals and sonics to mask thematic or narrative weaknesses. In The Neon...
Originàrio: Food with an Accent

Originàrio: Food with an Accent

We went along to the recent launch event for originàrio online shop to discover the secret ingredients used by top Michelin star chefs that are now finally available to the general public. At originàrio, the aim is to bring rare and authentic produce from some of Italy’s finest artisanal producers...
The Mermaid Blu-ray review: not quite a cult classic

The Mermaid Blu-ray review: not quite a cult classic

As China’s box office prowess continues to mount, U.S. studios are increasingly insistent on tailoring films to make a dent in the market. But even as Hollywood scrambles to adapt its product for the Chinese market, Chinese filmmakers seem less concerned with pulling off the reverse. Case in point: Stephen...
Spiritualism in Art Revealed at Courtauld Gallery

Spiritualism in Art Revealed at Courtauld Gallery

Given that the Courtauld Institute and Gallery, both part of the premises of London’s iconic Somerset House, boast such an impressive and art-historically significant permanent collection, any temporary exhibition hosted within the space must be not only mindful of the location and its heritage, but equally must be seen to...
Queen of Earth review: complex and merciless

Queen of Earth review: complex and merciless

Aside from the 16mm photography (courtesy of regular DP Sean Price Williams) and spiky dialogue, Queen of Earth has little in common with Alex Ross Perry’s recent directorial breakthrough, Listen Up Philip. That film, led by an acerbic performance from an asshole Jason Schwartzman, felt Andersonian in tone, knowingly pretentious...
Food For Thought - Artists Take Over Restaurants

Food For Thought – Artists Take Over Restaurants

Even if you are interested in art, or even really interested in art, it does not necessarily mean you want to spend every spare minute of your time traipsing around a museum exhibition that you feel you ought to see because everyone else is raving about it. We often go...
The Colony review: mixed thrills

The Colony review: mixed thrills

Cults make for inherently compelling settings, the chance to explore our religious anxieties and vices within a dramatically convenient microcosm of society. The cult at the heart of The Colony, formerly known as Colonia, has it all: religious fervour, iron discipline, and corruption running right to its core. It’s no surprise,...
Caravaggio and the Painters of the North at Thyssen-Bornemisza Museum, Madrid

Caravaggio and the Painters of the North at Thyssen-Bornemisza Museum, Madrid

Caravaggio, the master of Baroque, has for a long time been the fascination of art historians, lauded as the man of mystery and the one of the most celebrated painters ever. He is known for being the bad-boy of Baroque – ever since his 17th century life, rumours have swirled...
West East Suites, Santorini

West East Suites, Santorini

Santorini spells a medley of nautical colours; a trail of white buildings with softened edges perched on black volcanic rock overlooking the glittering Aegean. It’s an architectural delight, an ocean-lovers dream, and frankly, a destination that should be on everyone’s list. This Greek island – the southernmost in the Cyclades...
Omer Tiroche Contemporary Art - Niki de Saint Phalle: Je Suis Une Vache Suisse

Omer Tiroche Contemporary Art – Niki de Saint Phalle: Je Suis Une Vache Suisse

At a time when many central London galleries – particularly in Cork Street – are closing it is exciting to find a new venture in the heart of traditional Mayfair. Omer Tiroche Contemporary Art opened just over a year ago in February 2015, but already seems a well-established presence on...
Crazy About Tiffany's review: beautiful and infuriating

Crazy About Tiffany’s review: beautiful and infuriating

Originating in 1837, Charles Lewis Tiffany’s jewellery store, popularised by the iconic film starring the Givenchy-clad Audrey Hepburn, has long been the go-to treasure trove for Hollywood stylists and the very, very wealthy (did I mention wealthy?). Millions of window shoppers from all over the world visit the company’s Fifth...
Prince Sakura Tower, Tokyo

Prince Sakura Tower, Tokyo

Enjoying the transient beauty of Japan’s Sakura season – that’s cherry blossom to you and I – is a rare experience that few Westerners are lucky enough to encounter. Despite the multiple forecasts and trackers, timing a trip in March and April is notoriously tricky as the flowers open for...
Latitude Festival – Big on Performing Arts. Chatting with Kiri Pritchard McLean and James Acaster

Latitude Festival – Big on Performing Arts. Chatting with Kiri Pritchard McLean and James Acaster

It sometimes feel like there is at least one festival every weekend, from the beginning of the season and the early weather riskers in June, through to the final slog to the Isle of Wight for Bestival – with the perpetually wet Glastonbury signalling the half way point has been...
River review: a promising thriller

River review: a promising thriller

The first feature film is always a step as important as it is difficult; director and writer Jamie M. Dagg, debuting this year with River, might have just laid the ground for a solid career. Although River is by no means perfect, it reveals a promising director; however, the script...
FOUND at Foundling Museum - The Charm of Lost Objects

FOUND at Foundling Museum – The Charm of Lost Objects

In September 2015, a series of images sent shockwaves across the globe: a three year old child lay face down, washed up on a beach in Turkey after an overloaded dingy containing Syrian refugees had capsized. As a result of the tragedy, thousands of Europeans opened their homes to complete...
That Cold Day in the Park Blu-ray review: visually inventive thriller

That Cold Day in the Park Blu-ray review: visually inventive thriller

Robert Altman rose to fame thanks to the success of 1970’s M.A.S.H., lifted out of the (then) doldrums of the TV industry to the lofty heights of Hollywood proper. But M.A.S.H. wasn’t his first feature film–before that came That Cold Day in the Park, a striking, effective thriller now unduly...
Eva Husson interview: 'I’ve never had an interest in group sex'

Eva Husson interview: ‘I’ve never had an interest in group sex’

A first feature film is a filmmaker’s best opportunity to make his or her mark, to fully assert themselves as a cinematic voice to be reckoned with. Surely Eva Husson’s lurid and striking film Bang Gang (A Modern Love Story), a chronicle of adolescent sexuality in which high school students...
Bang Gang (A Modern Love Story) review: deeply alluring

Bang Gang (A Modern Love Story) review: deeply alluring

In the late ‘90s, in a small, broadly anonymous American town, something quite astonishing happened. Syphilis began to spread throughout the town’s younger population, something of an archaic sexually transmitted disease usually associated with the promiscuous intelligentsia of the late 19th century rather than contemporary school children. After the initial...
House of Peroni – Where Italian Art and Food Collide

House of Peroni – Where Italian Art and Food Collide

Everyone knows that Italy is the country of taste and style. It’s widely recognised for its art and design, and now the Italian beer company Peroni, has bought a flavour of that to a corner of East London along the canal for the summer. The maestro of style Margherita Missoni...
Oliver Sweeney Raises Awareness for Prostate Cancer

Oliver Sweeney Raises Awareness for Prostate Cancer

Oliver Sweeney’s flagship Covent Garden store was taken over last Thursday for a one-off drinks and shopping evening just in time for Father’s Day, courtesy of Prostate Cancer UK. The charity has just launched a new campaign, Men United, to encourage men to be a bit more open about discussing...
Sour Grapes review: entertaining wine thriller

Sour Grapes review: entertaining wine thriller

Sour Grapes screened as part of Sheffield Doc/Fest 2016. Sour Grapes is a tragi-comedy about the love of wine and a young man who decided to fool the world’s richest collectors. But its subtext examines the frankly bizarre surplus of monies the very richest in society has to throw around....
Behemoth review: 'the most beautiful journey into hell'

Behemoth review: ‘the most beautiful journey into hell’

Behemoth screened as part of Sheffield Doc/Fest 2016. Zhao Liang’s latest documentary is the most beautiful journey into hell. Via truly exquisite cinematography the film examines mining in inner Mongolia, an area rich in natural resources and fast becoming an environmental casualty of China’s rabid hunger for coal. The film...
Toby Jones interview: 'It felt very un-American'

Toby Jones interview: ‘It felt very un-American’

If you’ve seen any major, mainstream sci-fi or fantasy movie in the last decade, there are good odds you’ve seen Toby Jones. He’s boasted roles in the Harry Potter, Captain America, and Hunger Games series, not to mention small screen roles on Doctor Who, Wayward Pines, and an upcoming villainous...
The Violators review: visually striking but fatally flawed

The Violators review: visually striking but fatally flawed

The Violators is novelist Helen Walsh’s debut feature; a visually striking film whose story proves to be highly intricate but ultimately too convoluted. Walsh places the trials and tribulations of fifteen-year-old Shelly, played brilliantly by Lauren McQueen, centre screen–and she is right to do so, for Shelly is the true...
Jack Daniels Celebrates Father's Day with Single Barrel

Jack Daniels Celebrates Father’s Day with Single Barrel

Jack Daniel’s Tennessee Whiskey is one of those iconic brands that transcends just the drinking world. When you think about the brand, you think quality, tradition, music, barbecue and of course a finely crafted spirit enjoyed by millions. They have recently redesigned their single barrel bottle to make it even...
Tale of Tales review: fairy tale madness

Tale of Tales review: fairy tale madness

If there’s one thing I can say with some confidence about Tale of Tales, it’s this: you’ve probably never seen anything quite like it before. Following its premiere at Cannes last year, Matteo Garrone’s fairy tale collection finally arrives in UK cinemas this week. Garrone takes as his inspiration not the...
On Form 2016 at Asthall Manor - the UK's best Sculpture Garden

On Form 2016 at Asthall Manor – the UK’s best Sculpture Garden

If you were to close your eyes and try to imagine the Cotswold idyll, the vision in your mind would not be far from Asthall Manor, with its rolling dairy fields, honey-stoned surrounding hamlets and tranquil cottage gardens. Home to the eccentric arts patron Rosie Pearson, the seventeenth century Jacobean...
Bebe Cave interview: 'Every day on set I was surprised'

Bebe Cave interview: ‘Every day on set I was surprised’

As first major film roles go, appearing in an Italian auteur’s demented collection of fairy tales, appearing alongside Toby Jones, an ogre, and a giant flea has to be one of the more memorable. But Tale of Tales was all in a day’s work for Bebe Cave, who turned 17...
Stuart Davis at The Whitney, New York - All That Jazz?

Stuart Davis at The Whitney, New York – All That Jazz?

Stuart Davis will be taking center stage at the Whitney this summer. The exhibition will chart the forty-year career of this child of the Ashcan and step-daddy of Pop, this all-American Modernist with his finger on the pulse and a beat to his brushstroke. Stuart Davis: self-professed Jazz Painter, are...
Where to Invade Next review: a softer side of Michael Moore

Where to Invade Next review: a softer side of Michael Moore

To enjoy a Michael Moore film, you must first enjoy Michael Moore. The filmmaker places himself at the centre of his on-screen universe, with those he meets or passes comment on merely small planets orbiting his sun. Moore is often agitated, he can be cantankerous and provocative, and he certainly...
When Marnie Was There review: a touch of Studio Ghibli charm

When Marnie Was There review: a touch of Studio Ghibli charm

By this point it goes without saying that there’s a certain pedigree attached to any Studio Ghibli release (not that that’s stopped me from saying it), but When Marnie Was There brings with it even more scrutiny than the Japanese animation giant’s average film. That’s thanks to something quite external...
North & South: Ruffians Marylebone Turns Art Gallery

North & South: Ruffians Marylebone Turns Art Gallery

When Ruffians Barbers opened in Marylebone this spring, it was always destined that the impressive space would be used for more than beard  and barnet trims. Throughout this summer, exactly that will be happening as Ruffians plays host to a collection of works from esteemed illustrator Robin Mackney, aka REWM. The...
Restaurant Review: The House of Ho

Restaurant Review: The House of Ho

The House of Ho opened its new flagship venue on Percy Street in August 2015 in a glamorous four-storey Fitzrovia townhouse that was once home to Caprice Holdings’ Bam Bou. Spearheaded by Chef Ian Pengelley (formerly of Gilgamesh), this modern Vietnamese restaurant is a smart affair with beautifully thought out...
Author: The JT LeRoy Story review: shallow literary doc

Author: The JT LeRoy Story review: shallow literary doc

Author: The JT LeRoy Story screens as part of Sundance London 2016. It started with a suicidal adult woman calling a children’s crisis line. When she began to speak she found herself channelling a teenage boy called Terminator: an HIV-positive ex-prostitute and junkie from the Deep South whose mother turned...
Wiener-Dog review: witty, acerbic, and strangely warm

Wiener-Dog review: witty, acerbic, and strangely warm

Wiener-Dog screens as part of Sundance London 2016. Despite what the title may suggest, Wiener-Dog is not about a dog. Not even a wiener-dog. I mean, it does feature a wiener-dog, and pretty prominently at that, but this isn’t exactly Marley & Me. Instead, it’s a witty, acerbic collection of...
The Intervention review: frustratingly conventional

The Intervention review: frustratingly conventional

The Intervention screens as part of Sundance London 2016. The Intervention, the writing and directorial debut of actor Clea DuVall, is about love and its struggle to survive within that dreaded encasement: the long-term relationship. It has a perfect structure, the compulsory twists and reverses, recurring imagery and lines that,...
Beauty in motion: Edgar Degas’ monotypes at MoMA

Beauty in motion: Edgar Degas’ monotypes at MoMA

Often remembered solely for his soft pastels of dainty ballerinas, practicing in the studio or rehearsing on stage, Edgar Degas is finally being exhibited in a new light by the Museum of Modern Art, New York. Organised by Jodi Hauptman, Senior Curator of drawings and prints, ‘A Strange New Beauty’...
Tallulah review: thoughtful and powerful

Tallulah review: thoughtful and powerful

Tallulah screens as part of Sundance London 2016. Tallulah, the opening film at this year’s resurgent Sundance London Film Festival after a world premiere at its bigger brother in Utah this January, is the sort of film that could all too easily gone very, very wrong. Its borderline schmaltzy tale...
The Weird, Wonderful Worlds of Studio Ghibli

The Weird, Wonderful Worlds of Studio Ghibli

Japanese animation giant Studio Ghibli released what looks uncomfortably like its final film in Japan in July 2014. Next week, almost two years later, When Marnie Was There reaches UK shores, but it’s far from the only Ghibli game in town. Instead, it’s got all 19 of the studio’s other...
Mizensir: From The Perfumer Who Defined The Nineties

Mizensir: From The Perfumer Who Defined The Nineties

Introducing Mizensir founder Alberto Morillas as the man who created CK One is probably a little misleading, although he did do exactly that, in 1994, which went on to become the defining fragrance of that decade’s minimal, androgynous identity. He then – as part of fragrance powerhouse Firmenich – created...
Race review: powerful sporting history

Race review: powerful sporting history

Set around the 1939 Berlin Olympics, Race follows the journey of Jesse Owens, an African-American athlete up against the pressures of his country, his sport, and the prejudices of the time as he went on to make sporting history. Stephan James stars as Owens, and the film begins as he...
Painting with Light at Tate Britain

Painting with Light at Tate Britain

A little more pizazz needed for an exhibition all about flash… The Tate Britain’s first exhibition celebrating the birth of photography and its consequential impact on British art of the Victorian and Edwardian era quite frankly lacks the pizzazz needed to make it flash. With the curators adopting a comparative...
The Nice Guys review: anarchic, witty action

The Nice Guys review: anarchic, witty action

There are certain trends to be found in a Shane Black film. There’ll probably be a central pairing who don’t quite see eye to eye (see: Lethal Weapon). It’ll likely be set at least partly in L.A., ideally at Christmas (see: Kiss Kiss Bang Bang). It’ll probably have some meta...
Moët & Chandon presents 'NOW or Neverland'

Moët & Chandon presents ‘NOW or Neverland’

For most of us, summer spells a series of sunny evenings sipping a glass of something cold – in the park, by the river, hell even on the train if we’re commuting. What’s not to celebrate about a glimmer of sunshine in the country of many clouds? Champagne megabrand Moët...
Warcraft: The Beginning review: over-stuffed spectacle

Warcraft: The Beginning review: over-stuffed spectacle

On one level, you’ve got to feel sorry for Duncan Jones and his fellow screenwriter Charles Leavitt. They were faced with the unenviable task of taking the sprawling Warcraft universe, the setting for multiple games including online phenomenon World of Warcraft, and distilling it into a single two-hour narrative. On...
Kate Beckinsale interview: 'I did a little PhD in Jane Austen'

Kate Beckinsale interview: ‘I did a little PhD in Jane Austen’

It’s possible that Kate Beckinsale has been a bit undersold by a career so far dominated by the likes of four entries in the Underworld franchise (with a fifth on the way) and a few recent duds like the Total Recall remake or last year’s Absolutely Anything. Or at least,...
Whit Stillman interview: 'I don’t think Jane Austen was feminist'

Whit Stillman interview: ‘I don’t think Jane Austen was feminist’

Whit Stillman’s slim filmography belies the depth of his contributions to cinema. His latest, Love & Friendship, is just his fifth feature film across a career that started in 1990 with Metropolitan, but it sits firmly in the established Stillman oeuvre – period trappings aside. Love & Friendship is Stillman’s...
The Daughter review: shattering power

The Daughter review: shattering power

Norwegian playwright Henrik Ibsen’s The Wild Duck is adapted for the big screen and an unfamiliar Australian setting in this emotional drama. The script by writer/director Simon Stone begins innocently enough with the impending wedding of callous and troubled patriarch Henry (Geoffrey Rush) to his ex-housekeeper Anna (Anna Torv), a...
Alice Through the Looking Glass review: over-inflated

Alice Through the Looking Glass review: over-inflated

Alice Through the Looking Glass arrives six years after its predecessor, with former director Tim Burton switching hats to a producer’s role. His move is perhaps unsurprising if we consider the lacklustre reviews suffered by the first film, but having grossed $1 billion worldwide, a sequel was always going to...
KENZO x H&M

KENZO x H&M

H&M this morning announce KENZO as their 2016 designer collaboration, with the collection set to launch on 3 November. After 13 designer collections since 2004 – including Karl Lagerfeld, Versace, Comme de Garcons, Alexander Wang and 2015’s Balmain, their most successful to date – the French brand is in good...
Love & Friendship review: wickedly witty

Love & Friendship review: wickedly witty

Adaptations of Jane Austen and her ilk have a not entirely undeserved reputation for being rather staid, serious affairs, taking their tone from the morally upright high society they tend to depict. Whit Stillman’s Love & Friendship thus comes as a blessed relief, rapier-sharp wordplay elevating the film beyond its...
Restaurant Review: Kojawan, Edgware Road

Restaurant Review: Kojawan, Edgware Road

The first impression you might have as you ascend the spiral staircase to Kojawan is that it’s kitsch, because it is, but that’s exactly what the intention was when it came to designing this dining space. The modern white, almost sci-fi, décor fuses futuristic and retro elements with inspiration taken from Japan,...
Andrew Steggall interview: 'Everybody knows about love and loneliness'

Andrew Steggall interview: ‘Everybody knows about love and loneliness’

Despite having written and directed four short films before venturing into feature-length with his outstanding debut Departure, British filmmaker Andrew Steggall comes from theatre, having trained as an actor at London’s Central School Of Speech and Drama and later turning to theatre directing. His background inevitably has played an important...
GONG launches 'Circle of Life' cocktail menu

GONG launches ‘Circle of Life’ cocktail menu

Sitting on the 52nd floor of the Shard, Head bartender Christian Maspes and the team at GONG have got an easy advantage with a rather spectacular view, unobstructed thanks to the building’s relative skyscraper isolation, the entirety of London unfolding out below. Bizarrely, the effect is perhaps even more impressive at Aqua on...
Departure review: lyrical, stirring filmmaking

Departure review: lyrical, stirring filmmaking

There are films that capture feelings and moods we’ve experienced in our lives so eerily you almost feel like you are reliving those moments. Of course the situations and scenarios won’t be exactly the same as the ones you went through, but the perception of it all transports you back...
Sing Street review: bittersweet pop hit

Sing Street review: bittersweet pop hit

There’s a deep vein of schlocky sentiment running through the heart of Sing Street, the treacly sort that could seem off putting, all cloying and sweet. But it’s balanced by an underlying darkness, a sense of real problems that all the feel good anthems in the world can’t fix, leaving...
X-Men: Apocalypse review: missing the X-factor

X-Men: Apocalypse review: missing the X-factor

X-Men remains cinema’s most venerable comic book continuity, retaining a single (admittedly loose, frayed) narrative thread through from 2000’s original right up to the new Apocalypse – twice the length of even the Marvel Cinematic Universe’s eight years atop the superhero throne. Is it any wonder, then, that it’s all...
The Propaganda Game DVD review: North Korea's war of words

The Propaganda Game DVD review: North Korea’s war of words

A foreign documentary filmed within North Korea (a.k.a. the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea – you know a country’s a dictatorship when it says it’s a democracy, a republic, and belongs to the people) was always going to be a strange beast. Spanish filmmaker Álvaro Longoria was given (predictably controlled)...
Sculpting Time: The Films of Andrei Tarkovsky

Sculpting Time: The Films of Andrei Tarkovsky

It would be hard to overstate the influence that Andrei Tarkovsky had on the world of cinema across the seven feature films he made in his lifetime. From his predilection for takes so long you begin to forget when they started, to his tendency to move seamlessly between dream and...
Interview with chef Andrew Wong

Interview with chef Andrew Wong

The evolution of the London restaurant scene has been faster than anything Darwin could have imagined. At the forefront of developing and refining the complex nature of Chinese cuisine in London is young masterchef, Andrew Wong. Working with a cuisine that has over 2,000 years of history and a country...
Savini at Criterion, Piccadilly

Savini at Criterion, Piccadilly

There’s a lot of history to both halves of Savini at Criterion. For one, there’s Savini – the original restaurant in Milan dates back to 1867, and has earned a reputation for fine dining in a city that knows a thing or two about food. Then there’s the site they...
Green Room review: A violent punk hit

Green Room review: A violent punk hit

There are some film premises that are so straightforwardly appealing that little else needs to be said about the movies behind them. ‘Punks vs. neo-Nazis’ is undoubtedly one of them, succinctly capturing what is to come and exactly why you’re going to want to see it. Anton Yelchin and Alia...
Everybody Wants Some!! Review: Infectiously enthusastic

Everybody Wants Some!! Review: Infectiously enthusastic

There’s a rather cunning use of exclamation marks in the title of Everybody Wants Some!! – it becomes impossible to discuss the film without sounding rampantly enthusiastic, no matter what you’re saying. Just try it. “I was a bit bored by Everybody Wants Some!!” It doesn’t work – who’s ever...
Candid's Round Up of Frieze New York

Candid’s Round Up of Frieze New York

Before entering the vast white tent (250,000 square feet to be precise), which returns once again to Randall’s Island for the 2016 opening of Frieze New York, visitors are pre-warned, as always of the multitude of things on view. It’s impossible – even for the most trained art expert –...
Florence Foster Jenkins review: 'touching, uncomplicated and dominantly silly'

Florence Foster Jenkins review: ‘touching, uncomplicated and dominantly silly’

A film based on the ‘worst singer in the world’ may sound tasteless and unsympathetic. Florence Foster Jenkins is perhaps initially slightly the latter but this is far too clever to offer audiences nearly two hours of dense mickey-taking. Director Stephen Frears hasn’t delivered anything close to previous award-winning efforts The...
Dim Sum Masterclass at Chinese Cricket Club, Blackfriars

Dim Sum Masterclass at Chinese Cricket Club, Blackfriars

Chinese Cricket Club lies in the heart of Central London at the Crowne Plaza Hotel, naming itself after the original Chinese National Cricket Team. The authentic restaurant is holding Dim Sum masterclasses for fans of the lip-smacking dish and where better to learn than at this first class venue, holder...
Lucile Hadzihalilovic interview: 'The adult world is something mysterious'

Lucile Hadzihalilovic interview: ‘The adult world is something mysterious’

Lucile Hadzihalilovic isn’t exactly a household name – and not just because most of us wouldn’t be quite sure how to pronounce it. The French director (the name’s Bosnian though, in case that had you confused) has only made two feature films: 2004’s Innocence, a cryptic tale of an isolated...
Evolution review: a hypnotic, horrifying poem

Evolution review: a hypnotic, horrifying poem

Evolution is a difficult film to pin down. Part Lovecraftian horror, part enigmatic poem, it’s a creature of entirely its own kind. It’s writer-director Lucile Hadzihalilovic’s second film, delayed on its way to the screen by the understandable challenges of securing finances for a cryptic exploration of childhood, pregnancy, and...
Alberto Giacometti & Yves Klein; In Search of the Absolute

Alberto Giacometti & Yves Klein; In Search of the Absolute

The chaos of post-war Paris produced monumental political, cultural, and social change in France, which came to a head with the ideological student revolt of May 1968. This same time period, 1945-1968, also gave rise to several concurrent art movements that we now view as the beginnings of contemporary art....
Restaurant Review: Galley, Islington

Restaurant Review: Galley, Islington

As this year’s most exciting addition to the Islington dining scene, Galley has garnered plenty of praise since its opening. Polish-born Marcel Grzyb and Oriona Robb are the brother-sister team behind the new restaurant, with Marcel taking over the kitchen, having spent 10 years as Head Chef at Soho’s Randall...
Knight of Cups review: Malick’s slip into self-parody

Knight of Cups review: Malick’s slip into self-parody

I have always found the use of the word ‘Marmite’, when describing an artistic phenomenon, a little lazy. It strikes me as a bit of a cop out. It fails to really say anything substantial and allows the user a sort of critical breakout clause from the object of his/her...
Blois, France – Where Old And New Art Have Always Collided

Blois, France – Where Old And New Art Have Always Collided

Blois is a small city of windy medieval streets nestled in the middle of the Loire Valley, just two hours train ride from Paris. It occupies an important and unique place in the way art is changing the landscape across Europe. The town is typically French with a mixture of rustic...
Son of Saul review: essential viewing

Son of Saul review: essential viewing

It’d be easy to fall victim to uninformed cynicism about yet another Holocaust-themed film that won both the Oscar and the Golden Globe for Best Foreign Language Film, plus the Grand Prix at Cannes when it premiered there last year. Yet Son of Saul is far more than the subtitled...
Sakura Menu at Sake no Hana, St. James

Sakura Menu at Sake no Hana, St. James

Blossom season might be coming to an end in the UK, but that doesn’t mean you can’t live out a floral fantasy in Mayfair. Sake no Hana has it right with their sakura pop up – designed to celebrate Japanese Cherry Blossom season – with a souped-up bar and a...
Gasworks: Sidsel Meineche Hansen ‘Second Sex War’

Gasworks: Sidsel Meineche Hansen ‘Second Sex War’

Alluding to Simone de Beauvoir’s 1949 feminist text, Gasworks’ latest exhibition in their newly renovated premises presents the work of Sidsel Meineche Hansen in ‘Second Sex War’. Immediately challenging and provocative, the exhibition uses the hotly desired Oculus Rift headset device to present a biting critique on the world of...
Captain America: Civil War review: spectacle meets emotion

Captain America: Civil War review: spectacle meets emotion

The Marvel movie template, no matter how successful, has proven its limits of late, comfortable familiarity sinking towards stale repetition. There’ll be a bad guy, with a plan to destroy the city/world/galaxy. There’ll be quips aplenty, and action scenes slowly ramping up to end, when someone will probably try and...
Louder Than Bombs review: engrossing cinema

Louder Than Bombs review: engrossing cinema

A distant relative of the mighty Lars Von Trier, Norwegian filmmaker Joachim Trier has undoubtedly earned a spot in the pantheon of the most interesting Scandinavian auteurs working today. Despite retaining the experimental vibes of Nordic cinema, he’s not a provocateur like the Danish director, but rather a pensive analyst of...
Restaurant Review: Mustard, Shepherd's Bush

Restaurant Review: Mustard, Shepherd’s Bush

Located a short walk from Brook Green and Brackenbury Village, Mustard Restaurant is a great addition to the SheBu scene, open for breakfast, lunch and dinner from Monday through to Sunday. The classic British Brasserie, named after the much-loved British condiment, has opened just in time for the arrival of...
Culturelines Sans Frontiers or Questioning Boundaries, in Athens

Culturelines Sans Frontiers or Questioning Boundaries, in Athens

The gallery and café-bar metamatictaf is hidden on a side street in Athens, a brief walk from the bustling Pandrossou and Monastiraki flea markets. You could easily miss the establishment’s name written alongside the immense, ancient doors, but once inside you’ll find multiple rooms strewn over two floors and a...
D&AD Festival, London – a celebration of contemporary creative industries

D&AD Festival, London – a celebration of contemporary creative industries

This week, taking place in the creative hub of East London – the Old Truman Brewery, D&AD Festival brings together the world’s pioneers in design and advertising for a series of talks, awards, events and workshops. Over 250 speakers will take over four stages from morning ‘til night, while local...
Jane Got a Gun review: faux feminism in the Wild West

Jane Got a Gun review: faux feminism in the Wild West

Natalie Portman does her best to break down the gender boundaries of the Western in this one-last-stand take on the genre, but stodgy pacing and an abundance of clichés prove too much for the gender bending to overcome. She’s the titular Jane, a mother and wife on the run from...
Miles Ahead review: a free-form jazz odyssey

Miles Ahead review: a free-form jazz odyssey

For a biopic of a musician who once claimed to have “changed music five or six times,” it’s probably fitting that Don Cheadle’s Miles Ahead isn’t much interested in following standard true-story-behind-the-famous-person template. There’s no cradle to grave story, no attempt to chart his rise to fame, and even surprisingly...
John Kørner at Victoria Miro – a journey of discovery

John Kørner at Victoria Miro – a journey of discovery

Copenhagen born John Kørner uses his painting as a method to exercise the mind – his images are mysterious visions that often feel like snap shots of an ambient dream. It was said that Rene Magritte would place his finger on the rim of a glass of water when falling...
Woodford Reserve at Whistling Shop, Shoreditch

Woodford Reserve at Whistling Shop, Shoreditch

Much has been said in the past about how dark it is in the Worship Street Whistling Shop (try saying that three times fast), but it bears repeating: this is a really dark bar. Nestled underground, and with just dim lights to suit its quasi-Victorian aesthetic, visibility drops to about...
Man with a Movie Camera Blu-ray review: a visual symphony

Man with a Movie Camera Blu-ray review: a visual symphony

Dzigo Vertov’s Man with a Movie Camera was boldly declared the greatest documentary of all time by esteemed cine-mag Sight and Sound recently, but it’s a term that suggests a comfortable, predictable format not to be found here. Shot in 1929, Man with a Movie Camera is undoubtedly Vertov’s crowning...
Made of Dough Pop Up at Market Yard

Made of Dough Pop Up at Market Yard

Goldhawk Road seems to be getting rather trendy. But perhaps that’s all because of Market Yard, a hip’n’gritty venue hosting foodie pop ups under the railway arches. Whatever the reason, we went west for a taste of Made of Dough’s legendary pizza, which will be served here with gusto until...
The Brand New Testament review: deft religious comedy

The Brand New Testament review: deft religious comedy

Jaco Van Dormael’s latest feature film, The Brand New Testament, is a strange beast, part black comedy and part introspective study into the human condition. When summed up in this manner it sounds a rather specialist affair and the subject matter, imagery, and mixture of tones create an undeniably surreal...
Exhibition on Screen - Painting the Modern Garden: Monet to Matisse

Exhibition on Screen – Painting the Modern Garden: Monet to Matisse

Whether you’ve already enjoyed the beautiful Royal Academy exhibition or are not able to visit before it closes next week, this film – the latest in the current series produced by Exhibition on Screen – is essential viewing. The Royal Academy has brought together an eclectic and impressive collection of...
Our Little Sister review: assured, elegant family drama

Our Little Sister review: assured, elegant family drama

Our Little Sister is a film about a trio of sisters whose lives are changed when their estranged father dies. He left their mother for another woman 20 years ago, and upon arriving at his funeral they meet the daughter that his affair produced for the first time. As the...
The Jungle Book review: wild and mythic

The Jungle Book review: wild and mythic

It comes as no small surprise that The Jungle Book is not only a marvellous film in its own right, but also worthy successor to its animated predecessor. Director Jon Favreau takes the ‘60s Disney classic as the inspiration for this remake – rather than returning to the source, Rudyard...
Aman Tokyo, Japan

Aman Tokyo, Japan

Occupying the top six floors of the Otemachi Tower in Tokyo’s famous Ginza shopping district lies Aman Tokyo, the brand’s sixth property to be designed by Kerry Hill architects. A somewhat dramatic departure from the company’s usual remote locations, this inner-city hotel brings Aman’s famed sense of serenity to the...
Neneh Cherry, Darkstar and Tim Head – a sonic and visual performance for Art of Patrón this Thursday in London

Neneh Cherry, Darkstar and Tim Head – a sonic and visual performance for Art of Patrón this Thursday in London

Patrón Tequila have come together with the legendary musician Nenah Cheery, electronic music duo Darkstar and digital visual artist Tim Head to curate a one off unique night of audio and graphic entertainment this Thursday in London. Highlighting some of the best artistic talent the city has to offer, the...
New Opening: Dalloway Terrace, Bloomsbury

New Opening: Dalloway Terrace, Bloomsbury

When a restaurant names itself after Virginia Woolf’s eponymous character Clarissa Dalloway, it’s setting the bar high. Dalloway Terrace opened at the end of March in prestigious hotel The Bloomsbury, and does rather a wonderful job of living up to expectations. Located just around the corner from the bustle of...
The Sound Barrier Blu-ray review: aeronautical thrills

The Sound Barrier Blu-ray review: aeronautical thrills

Among the celebrated pantheon of British director David Lean’s body of work, The Sound Barrier is oft-forgotten. Next to the likes of Lawrence of Arabia, The Bridge on the River Kwai, and Doctor Zhivago, this black-and-white entry from the middle of his career is little known today – despite both...
Spring in Paris: An art lovers guide to Europe’s cultural capital

Spring in Paris: An art lovers guide to Europe’s cultural capital

If you have ever been to Paris in the spring, I am sure you would agree that it is truly the best time to visit the city. Dearly sought after rays of sunshine cast golden shadows over the Haussmannian boulevards, whilst the blue skies reawaken dreams of long evenings spent...
Riedel Crystal Celebrates 260th Anniversary

Riedel Crystal Celebrates 260th Anniversary

With 260 years of exceptional craftsmanship under its belt, it’s no surprise that Riedel Crystal remains a coveted household brand in luxury glassmaking. To celebrate this milestone anniversary, the company’s multiple award-winning designer, Maximilian J. Riedel, has come up with an innovative decanter design that is modern, functional and undeniably...
Boulevard review: a touching final gift from Robin Williams

Boulevard review: a touching final gift from Robin Williams

After Robin Williams’ death, four films in which he starred were yet to be released. More than a year and a half later, we can finally see the last of them. Although Boulevard clearly deviates from the other three features’ comedic tones, it is again Williams’ presence that gives the...
Midnight Special review: rapturous science fiction

Midnight Special review: rapturous science fiction

It’s perhaps too rare for modern science fiction to instil a real sense of wonder and awe. Despite ballooning budgets and spiralling spectacle, it’s not that often that something comes along to really make your jaw drop. Thankfully, despite a couple of niggling flaws, Jeff Nichols’ Midnight Special does exactly...
Aqua Kyoto Celebrates Cherry Blossom Season

Aqua Kyoto Celebrates Cherry Blossom Season

To celebrate the arrival of Spring and warmer weather, aqua kyoto has launched a special cherry blossom spring menu to embrace the ancient Japanese tradition of Hanami (which literally translates to flower-viewing). This practise is still popular to this current day, where people gather to observe the mesmerising beauty of...
Dheepan review: gripping and insightful

Dheepan review: gripping and insightful

In Cannes 2015, Jacques Audiard returned to the festival with his latest film, Dheepan. The film was a success and stormed to the top and was given the highest award – the Palme d’Or. The competition was fierce and the announcement was met with a mix of acceptance and shock,...
Spencer Finch’s “The Opposite of Blindness” at Lisson Gallery

Spencer Finch’s “The Opposite of Blindness” at Lisson Gallery

London’s Lisson Gallery is one of a handful of influential galleries lying outside the Mayfair heart of the commercial contemporary enclave. Attracting a roster of established and important artists, it proves that location isn’t everything – it’s the quality of the product. In his third solo show at Lisson Gallery,...
Proprioception – Manuele Cerutti at the ICI in London

Proprioception – Manuele Cerutti at the ICI in London

Pro-pri-o-cep-tion: a word used primarily in the medical world, it refers to our body’s sense of its own movements and awareness of its positioning in space. Linked to kinaesthesia which refers to the movement alone, proprioception is concerned with the subtleties of our consciousness and rapport with and within our...
The Brand New Testament - exclusive clip

The Brand New Testament – exclusive clip

The Brand New Testament looks to be an example of that uniquely Franco-Belgian sort of surreal, manic comedy, made popular in the west by the likes of Jean-Pierre Jeunet. Jaco Van Dormael’s film centres on God – here an eccentric jerk living in Brussels – and his ten-year-old daughter Ea,...
Win tickets to Barclaycard's British Summer Time Hyde Park

Win tickets to Barclaycard’s British Summer Time Hyde Park

Set amongst the beautiful lawns and majestic trees of the Royal Hyde Park, this concert series began in 2013, with The Rolling Stones reliving their seminal 1969 live concert in the park. They recreated the electric atmosphere with the help of Bon Jovi, Lionel Richie, Jennifer Lopez and more, filling...
Bar Review: Shochu Lounge

Bar Review: Shochu Lounge

German restaurateur, Rainer Becker has been delighting celebrities and mere mortals alike at his Roka Charlotte Street branch since 2004 with his stunning, sumptuous contemporary Japanese cuisine. Perhaps less known is their subterranean secret bar, Shochu lounge in the basement. It has been offering groundbreaking modern Japanese cocktails and distilled...
Black Mountain Poets review: enthusiastically off-kilter

Black Mountain Poets review: enthusiastically off-kilter

“We’re just women trying to steal a JCB,” say Claire (Dolly Wells) and Lisa Walker (Alice Lowe), on the lam from the long arm of the law and caught up in criminality. That may be by naivety alone, but these two misfit sisters soon find themselves on an enthusiastically off-kilter...
Victoria review: brutish, brilliant, and breakneck

Victoria review: brutish, brilliant, and breakneck

Move over Birdman (or fly over perhaps) – one-take films have a new magnum opus to aspire to. Sebastian Shipper’s heart-poundingly exhilarating Victoria is a single-shot sensation, free from the conceit of digital splicing as the camera rolls non-stop for 150 minutes. Following a group of manic millennials getting into...
Restaurant Review: The Woodford

Restaurant Review: The Woodford

When it comes to London’s gourmet dining hubs, South Woodford is probably not going to be the first place to roll off your tongue. That might change if Ben Murphy has anything to do with it though, as the former Young National Chef of the Year is bringing some fine...
Clint Mansell in Conversation at the Royal Albert Hall

Clint Mansell in Conversation at the Royal Albert Hall

If you’ve paid much attention to film over the last decade, there’s a good chance you’ve heard one of Clint Mansell’s scores. Not only is he the go-to composer for Darren Aronofsky, working with him on Requiem for a Dream, The Wrestler, Black Swan and more, he’s also scored recent...
Eddie the Eagle review: relentlessly upbeat

Eddie the Eagle review: relentlessly upbeat

At the local pub quiz night you might smile smugly to yourself, giving your team a complacent nod as the quizmaster asks, ‘Who came last in the 1988 Olympic ski jump event?’ Eddie the Eagle, of course. This is likely the extent of your Michael ‘Eddie’ Edwards knowledge. The legacy...
Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice review: exhausting

Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice review: exhausting

God, here we go again. Zack Snyder is back, following up 2013’s moody Superman snorefest Man of Steel with the even moodier Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice, at risk of being crushed under its own title if the weight of expectation doesn’t get to it first. Distraught at the...
Druid's Botanist Cup Cocktail at Nightjar

Druid’s Botanist Cup Cocktail at Nightjar

There’s something inherently suspicious about the concept of ‘foraged ingredients’, as if something you found growing down the bottom of the garden is likely to be more appealing than the sort of crops we’ve put effort into actually cultivating. We’ve found plenty of mushrooms growing in dark places out in...
The unbreakable rope – an exploration of sexuality within Islam

The unbreakable rope – an exploration of sexuality within Islam

Inspired by a line from an eighth century Classical Arabic poem by the great Classical poet Abu Nawas, The unbreakable rope – a new exhibition in London, aims to portray the past, present and future of sexuality and love within the Middle East as being diverse and cosmopolitan. Commissioned by...
Disorder review: a rough diamond

Disorder review: a rough diamond

The second feature film from director Alice Winocour, Disorder is a tense and unsettling ride through the psyche of a traumatised ex-soldier. The film’s phenomenal score and a muted performance from Matthias Schoenaerts keep hearts racing and palms sweaty, even when proceedings begin to drag. Disorder is a French-language picture...
Four Seasons Hotel Prague

Four Seasons Hotel Prague

Once the hub of the Holy Roman Empire, Prague has rather lost its rightful place among the great medieval European cities, relegated in the popular imagination to stag dos and hen nights. Those so quick to write it off are missing out on a city rich with history, culture and...
Zootropolis review: anthropomorphic social commentary

Zootropolis review: anthropomorphic social commentary

Disney’s latest offering is yet another tale of anthropomorphised animals, once again taking a simple story and using it to tackle more complex themes, attacking inequality in a way that isn’t heavy-handed nor too manipulative. The film opens with a quick explanation that animals have evolved beyond their original predatory...
Mr Bao: Bringing Taiwan to Peckham

Mr Bao: Bringing Taiwan to Peckham

I’ve lived in London for almost six years and had never been to Peckham, so when an invite to dinner arrived at the newly opened Mr Bao on Peckham’s Rye Lane, I thought I’d show my friend, my Oyster card and myself new things. The promise of Taiwanese steamed buns...
Barry Flanagan; Animal, Vegetable, Mineral at Waddington Custot Galleries – the original British sculptural maverick.

Barry Flanagan; Animal, Vegetable, Mineral at Waddington Custot Galleries – the original British sculptural maverick.

Barry Flanagan is pregarded as one of the fathers of British conceptual sculpture. His first solo show in London in 1966 (50 years ago since this one) was lauded as being progressive for its use of unusual and exhilarating materials. One critic described the show at London’s Rowan Gallery as...
Mark Tildesley interview: 'High-Rise floats in a world that’s slightly strange'

Mark Tildesley interview: ‘High-Rise floats in a world that’s slightly strange’

With its titular monolithic housing block and alt-’70s setting, Ben Wheatley’s High-Rise is a bit of a design dream – even if the film itself hews closer to nightmares. Brutalist architecture and modernist opulence abound, so we grabbed the chance to ask production designer Mark Tildesley about working on the...
Marguerite review: beautiful and harrowing

Marguerite review: beautiful and harrowing

It is somewhat befitting, if not foretelling, that when we first come face to face with Marguerite she chooses to perform ‘Der Holle Rache Kocht in meinem Herzen’. Directly translated it reads, ‘The vengeance of Hell burns in my heart’ –  and yes, when she opens her mouth and almost...
Reza Derakshani: The Breeze at Dawn, at Sophia Contemporary Gallery - Iranian Abstract Art

Reza Derakshani: The Breeze at Dawn, at Sophia Contemporary Gallery – Iranian Abstract Art

Sophia Contemporary is the latest in a series of country specific galleries to open its doors in Mayfair. Hot on the foot of the Italianisation of Dover Street and Albemarle Street, springs of periphery galleries have opened in succession, often focusing on the arts of the Middle East and Asia....
The Pass review: simple but powerful

The Pass review: simple but powerful

It’s easy to see why The Pass was selected to open this year’s BFI Flare LGBT Film Festival. There’s the fact that it stars Russell Tovey, one of the most in-demand out actors around, especially after his excellent turn in HBO’s Looking. Then there’s its pedigree, adapted for the screen...
Disorder - exclusive clip

Disorder – exclusive clip

Next week’s releases are dominated by a couple of cinematic behemoths in the shape of Zootropolis and Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice, so it’d be easy to forgive most other films for steering clear. Matthias Schoenaerts isn’t so easily spooked though, and he’ll be tackling the animated animals and...
Ben Wheatley interview: 'High-Rise looks like a playbook for the modern world'

Ben Wheatley interview: ‘High-Rise looks like a playbook for the modern world’

Ben Wheatley has been one of British cinema’s critical darlings ever since his 2009 feature debut Down Terrace, and he’s continued to experiment with form and genre since with the likes of Kill List, Sightseers and A Field in England. Working closely with his regular screenwriter (and wife) Amy Jump,...
Venturing Beyond: Graffiti and the Everyday Utopias of the Street of the street Sponsored  by Patrón Tequila

Venturing Beyond: Graffiti and the Everyday Utopias of the Street of the street Sponsored by Patrón Tequila

Hot on the heels of the success of Mapping the City and Futurismo Ancestral, Somerset House is again teaming up with the arts collaboration A(by)P to present a new series of fresh commissions by seventeen of the worlds best graffiti artists. Graffiti art has received its share of bad press...
10 Cloverfield Lane review: tense and inventive thriller

10 Cloverfield Lane review: tense and inventive thriller

Let’s get one thing clear from the get-go: 10 Cloverfield Lane isn’t a sequel to 2008’s Cloverfield – at least not in any conventional sense. It doesn’t follow on from those events, feature any of the same characters or that film’s city-levelling giant monster, or even include the much-derided shakycam...
Neapolitan Pizza Masterclass at Rossopomodoro

Neapolitan Pizza Masterclass at Rossopomodoro

Rossopomodoro has been beckoning pizza lovers to a series of masterclasses on selected days in February and March, transporting visitors into a Neapolitan Dream. Aiming to reinvent the classic vibe of pizzerias in Italy, Rossopomodoro sources its fresh and flavoursome ingredients from the Naples region, while the chefs come from true Neapolitan...
Waking Life Blu-ray review: woozy metaphysics

Waking Life Blu-ray review: woozy metaphysics

Richard Linklater’s filmography splits, mostly neatly, into two distinct categories: fun, if wistful, comedies like School of Rock or Dazed and Confused; and meandering, philosophical texts including the Beyond… trilogy and last year’s Oscar-winner Boyhood. Waking Life belongs unmistakably to the latter camp, and can boast being both Linklater’s least...
David Farr interview: 'Film needs to keep finding its uniqueness'

David Farr interview: ‘Film needs to keep finding its uniqueness’

After a successful festival route that included Toronto, London, and the Berlinale, David Farr’s feature film debut, psychological thriller The Ones Below, finally arrives in UK cinemas, channelling Hitchcock, Lynch, and Polanski but also announcing an interesting new voice in British cinema. This unnerving tale of two neighbouring married couples...
Top Picks: Kosher Food and Wine Experience

Top Picks: Kosher Food and Wine Experience

In recent years, the word kosher has become synonymous with high quality products, rather than just relating to food and wine for the Jewish community. One of the best places to sample such amazing products is at the annual Kosher Food and Wine Experience event, which has been going on...
Kung Fu Panda 3 review: surprisingly heartfelt

Kung Fu Panda 3 review: surprisingly heartfelt

Continuing his ‘legendary adventure of awesomeness,’ Po faces his biggest challenge yet as the master of destruction Kai has returned from the spirit realm, and only one person can stop him: Po, the Dragon Warrior. But he must first travel down a road of discovery to find out who he...
The Ones Below review: tense Hitchcockian thriller

The Ones Below review: tense Hitchcockian thriller

It seems that in today’s cinematic landscape, where the thriller is a genre mostly associated with blazing guns and big action set-pieces, the Hitchcockian vibes of a good old-fashioned psychological giallo are a rarity to come by. That’s why a film like The Ones Below is a welcome reminder of...
Anomalisa review: haunting, mesmeric animation

Anomalisa review: haunting, mesmeric animation

To suggest that Anomalisa is Charlie Kaufman’s most conventional film yet speaks less of how approachable this movie is (not very), and more of how consistently surprising his filmography thus far has been. The writer (and occasional director) of Being John Malkovich, Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind and Synecdoche,...
Restaurant Review: Kanada-Ya, Haymarket

Restaurant Review: Kanada-Ya, Haymarket

There’s a touch of the homemade to Kanada-Ya Haymarket, and not just in the kitchen – the lightweight wooden furniture has a flimsiness that suggests the waiting staff may have bashed it together from some knock-off Ikea sets on their lunch break. It all held together for the duration of...
The Armory Show in New York - An African Perspective

The Armory Show in New York – An African Perspective

With characteristic aplomb, the Armory Show opened its doors to the public on Thursday March 3rd. The annual fair remains New York’s leading international art fair, which after two decades has more than cemented its place at the centre of the city’s art calendar. Now in it’s 22nd year, for...
Truth review: preachy journo drama

Truth review: preachy journo drama

Armed with an all-star cast, Truth wades into the world of investigative journalism seeking to bloody some noses. The movie does land some good blows, with some wonderful performances and a compelling dramatisation of the journalistic process (in itself a tall order), but it lacks a coherent tone and lurches...
The Chedi Andermatt, Switzerland

The Chedi Andermatt, Switzerland

Andermatt is one of the lesser known alpine Swiss gems, and those who do know it, know it for one thing: The Chedi Andermatt. Undoubtedly one of the most luxurious and beautiful hotels in the world, The Chedi’s hidden location makes it all the more appealing. The Setting During the...
Hail, Caesar! review: lightweight Hollywood farce

Hail, Caesar! review: lightweight Hollywood farce

Hail, Caesar!, the Coen Brothers’ latest, is more a series of entertaining vignettes than a movie. That would be fine, except you don’t realise this until halfway through, as there’s the semblance of a good plot being dangled in front of you for at least an hour. To surmise, we...
Barbers, Beards, Beer: Ruffians Marylebone

Barbers, Beards, Beer: Ruffians Marylebone

Now we aren’t going to tell you that the male grooming market is growing faster than women’s, that the beard is still back in a big, big way, or that the traditional barbershop is not enough for most of today’s breed of stylish, well-groomed and handsome bearded gentlemen. You all...
Hitchcock/Truffaut review: compelling but inessential documentary

Hitchcock/Truffaut review: compelling but inessential documentary

In our current age of unfettered veneration, it’s hard to imagine a time when Alfred Hitchcock was not considered one of the indisputable masters of cinema. Harder still to think he’d need anyone’s help in establishing himself as such. Yet in the sixties, Hitchcock’s commercial success, publicity stunts and condescending...
New Opening: K Bar, South Kensington

New Opening: K Bar, South Kensington

Following a complete redesign of its interiors over the course of 12 months, The Kensington Hotel has launched once more with refurbished guest rooms, a redesigned restaurant and a brand new drinking den; K Bar. Never ones to miss out on a hotly anticipated opening, we polished up and went...
Mark Bern: The 3D Pixel Artist Who is Redefining Art

Mark Bern: The 3D Pixel Artist Who is Redefining Art

The Swiss artist Mark Bern has had a quite unorthodox journey into the art world. For years, Bern was creating art prints for himself on his computer . Two and a half years ago, he had a few friends over his place who complimented his work without realising it was...
The Ones Below - exclusive clip

The Ones Below – exclusive clip

After appearances at the Toronto, London, and Berlin film festivals, The Ones Below is finally winging its way to UK cinemas next week, and we’re excited to reveal a rather tense exclusive clip from the upcoming thriller. The Ones Below finds Clémence Poésy and Stephen Campbell Moore as a happy...
CMYK by Michaela Zimmer for FOLD Gallery

CMYK by Michaela Zimmer for FOLD Gallery

The month-long exhibition CMYK by artist Michaela Zimmer opens this week at the up-and-coming FOLD Gallery in Fitzrovia. Although this is the German artist’s first solo exhibition in the UK, it’s apparent upon viewing that there is something visceral about Zimmer’s work. When asked on recurring themes in her art,...
Secret Cinema review: enthusiastic but distracting theatrics

Secret Cinema review: enthusiastic but distracting theatrics

It would appear that the team behind Secret Cinema were more stung than they let on by critics’ barbs that their recent Star Wars and Back to the Future events were not so secret. Their latest, you see, is a #TellNoOne event, a return to the organisation’s origins staging events...
Experimenter review: stylish psychological biopic

Experimenter review: stylish psychological biopic

There’s clearly a strong story to tell in the life of experimental psychologist Stanley Milgram, but despite an able cast and some welcome stylistic flourishes, Experimenter never quite gets its results. Milgram, played here by Peter Sarsgaard, was the Yale researcher responsible for now-infamous obedience experiments, in which participants were...
Royal Salute's 'Bohemian Aristocracy'

Royal Salute’s ‘Bohemian Aristocracy’

Gone are the days when whisky was considered a drink for the older among us; on the contrary it seems to be flourishing – more often than not the liquor of choice for many a punter. Prestige British Whisky veteran Royal Salute is certainly doing a thing or two to...
Rob Auton - The Water show - A charming wander through the mind of an optimist

Rob Auton – The Water show – A charming wander through the mind of an optimist

Rob Auton is a York born comedian who breaks the mould for stand up. Part spoken word, part comedy, part touching insight in to the mind of a day dreamer with an oblique perspective on life, Rob’s comedy is like a meandering train of charming thoughts centered around the theme...
London Glassblowing - Reassessing the Craft of Glass

London Glassblowing – Reassessing the Craft of Glass

Glass art is something that until recent years has remained to the wider audience, something that was seen as more of a craft than an art. However in recent decades, certain artists have helped push these crafts, materials and techniques in to the public eye, and more importantly, the big...
London Beer Week: 22 - 28 February 2016

London Beer Week: 22 – 28 February 2016

The much anticipated London Beer Week is back this year to celebrate all things barley and boozy. Starting today and lasting through until Sunday, the festivities will take place throughout London’s drinking dens. A £10 wristband – available from the Sharp’s Brewery London Beer Week Hub – will grant beer...
Performing for the Camera at Tate Modern – shifting the focus to subject

Performing for the Camera at Tate Modern – shifting the focus to subject

The Tate Modern has just opened a new photography exhibition with a twist. Rather than focusing on the photographer, the emphasis has shifted to analysing the works through the role of the performer in front of the lense. Performing for the Camera contains over 500 images, from the inception of...
Freeheld review: a diligent TV movie

Freeheld review: a diligent TV movie

Cinema and art have the power to make a difference, which is why Freeheld is an important film that needs to be watched and pondered, as it highlights the sociopolitical contradictions within an allegedly progressive country like the United States of America. Yet despite that, from an artistic standpoint the...
Bone Tomahawk review: true gristle

Bone Tomahawk review: true gristle

Fittingly enough, watching Bone Tomahawk feels a bit like getting whacked upside the head by a heavy implement, leaving you dizzy, disoriented, and just a little bit nauseous. Kurt Russell is on his typical grizzled, grouchy form as the Sheriff of the quiet frontiers town of Bright Hope. When a...
New Opening: Lucky Chip Burgers & Wine, Dalston

New Opening: Lucky Chip Burgers & Wine, Dalston

Lucky Chip has come a long way since its humble beginnings as a market stall in 2011. Founder Ben Denner has since taken his burgers through a range of pop-ups, markets and pub residencies, and is now settling down in his first permanent site: Lucky Chip Burgers & Wine on...
Chronic review: challenging, uneven drama

Chronic review: challenging, uneven drama

Upbeat, this is not. Chronic stars Tim Roth as David, a carer for patients with conditions that substantially limit their mobility and independence – late stage AIDS patients, stroke victims, that sort of thing. So far, so cheery. Things are further complicated by David’s at times unhealthy relationships with those...
The Art of Hesitation – Looking back at Singapore Art Stage

The Art of Hesitation – Looking back at Singapore Art Stage

Usually when there is something very expensive on offer, the wealthy residents of Singapore don’t need to be invited twice. Singapore has after all one of the highest concentrations of multi-millionaires in the world. Yet, the siren call of the arts has been slightly overheard at this year’s Singapore Art...
Sanderson Hotel Launches Healthy Nourish Package

Sanderson Hotel Launches Healthy Nourish Package

Struggling to keep that new year diet on track? You’re not alone. Luckily, iconic West End hotel Sanderson is on hand with its Nourish Package, the ideal solution to beat away those carb-craving winter blues. Making good use of Sanderson’s restaurant, which recently played host to a popular Allan Pickett...
Kanye West's Yeezy Season 3 launch

Kanye West’s Yeezy Season 3 launch

So Help Me God, Swish, Waves and now The Life of Pablo – Kanye West’s newest release finally arrived on Thursday night as he hosted a stream of the new album to coincide with the Yeezy Season 3 fashion launch. Through carefully placed media hype from a dedicated PR team,...
Martin Parr: The Rhubarb Triangle & Other Stories at The Hepworth Wakefield

Martin Parr: The Rhubarb Triangle & Other Stories at The Hepworth Wakefield

Martin Parr is the most iconic British photographer of our generation; quite possibly because he captures such iconic photos of “Britishness”. He is known for his anthropological studies of the social strata of the country – but always with a great eye for snapping what may at first seem mundane,...
Candid Magazine's Valentine's Top Ten Love-Themed Artworks

Candid Magazine’s Valentine’s Top Ten Love-Themed Artworks

“Art must be an expression of love or it is nothing” Marc Chagall “People should fall in love with their eyes closed” Andy Warhol “The more I think about it, the more I realize there is nothing more artistic than to love others” Vincent Van Gogh Love, this great force...
Mud Museum - collected, created and curated mud and fire

Mud Museum – collected, created and curated mud and fire

Two London based artists, Rose de Borman and Robert Rush, have taken over a derelict delicatessen and house in Kings Cross for a week-long art exhibition of their latest collaborative ceramics project. The contents of the house and shop front has been collected, created and curated by the pair, in...
Italian Post-War exhibitions happening in London right now

Italian Post-War exhibitions happening in London right now

It’s an exceptionally good moment for London-based fans of post-war Italian art. The major auction houses are all presenting a strong showing of big name Arte Povera artists in the Contemporary sales this week and three Mayfair galleries have well-timed exhibitions of Italian artists that opened this week. Candid visited...
Zoolander 2 review: an uninspired rehash

Zoolander 2 review: an uninspired rehash

It’s fitting enough that Zoolander 2 finds Ben Stiller back to satirise the fashion industry’s vainest excesses, because it’s difficult to imagine any film this year will be a more transparent vanity project for all involved. 15 years after the cult success of clueless modelling comedy Zoolander, Stiller is back...
Glasgow – the rebellious prodigy of the UK’s contemporary art scene

Glasgow – the rebellious prodigy of the UK’s contemporary art scene

If the UK’s contemporary art scene were a map, it would appear with London as a huge domineering capital, then small pockets of buzz dotted around the nuclei. These pockets, for a long time, have been seen as a bit naïve, a bit traditional, a bit folky. The sort of...
Deadpool review: crass, childish, and consistently entertaining

Deadpool review: crass, childish, and consistently entertaining

‘Crass’ is about the best word to sum up the Deadpool experience – and your immediate reaction to the word will be the best predictor of your enjoyment of the film. Ryan Reynolds is Wade Wilson, a.k.a Deadpool, a.k.a. the Merc with a Mouth, the quick-witted Marvel super/anti-hero last on...
Restaurant Review: 24 St Georges, Brighton

Restaurant Review: 24 St Georges, Brighton

Located in the heart of Kemp Town, a bustling area of Brighton set back from the seafront, with a slightly more mature and refined atmosphere, is the modern British restaurant 24 St Georges. Sourcing local and seasonal ingredients to curate an ever-changing menu, the restaurant is putting Brighton dining on...
War, abstraction and censorship in Southeast Asia

War, abstraction and censorship in Southeast Asia

  A closer look at the Prudential Eye Awards 2016 in Singapore The Singapore Art Week 2016 is a wrap. The country’s prestigious nine-day art festival is steadily growing every year, making the city more attractive than ever for investors, art lovers and young emerging artists in Southeast Asia. One...
Luca Guadagnino interview: 'I try to make my camera as trans as possible'

Luca Guadagnino interview: ‘I try to make my camera as trans as possible’

Luca Guadagnino is not an easy man to interview. We’re discussing his latest film, A Bigger Splash, a manic exploration of desire, temptation, and The Rolling Stones on the dusty Italian island of Pantelleria, starring the enviable combination of Tilda Swinton, Ralph Fiennes, Dakota Johnson, and Matthias Schoenaerts. The Italian...
Nira Alpina, Switzerland

Nira Alpina, Switzerland

St. Moritz sings of glamour with glittering pop-up ice bars, fine dining restaurants and a social scene to match the south of France. Fun, but all that razzle dazzle gets a little exhausting after a day or two. Opt instead for Silvaplana, St. Mortiz’s less exuberant, but equally charming sister...
Rhett Reese & Paul Wernick interview: 'Deadpool is a really fucked up romantic comedy'

Rhett Reese & Paul Wernick interview: ‘Deadpool is a really fucked up romantic comedy’

Rhett Reese and Paul Wernick have good reason to be excited when we speak. The screenwriting partners who shot to Hollywood’s attention with 2009’s blackly comedic Zombieland are just days away from the release of Deadpool, the Ryan Reynolds superhero movie with a difference. Worlds away from his abortive appearance...
Jackson Pollock: A Collection Survey, 1934 – 1954 at Museum of Modern Art, New York

Jackson Pollock: A Collection Survey, 1934 – 1954 at Museum of Modern Art, New York

Throughout the first half of the twentieth century, numerous artists, writers, critics and scholars pushed the boundaries of social thought and practice, revolutionised the arts and thereby developed the concept of Modernism. Perceiving the cultural changes in society following the industrial revolution, and to mirror the countless social, political and...
Lucy + Jorge Orta at the new wing of Attenborough Arts Centre, opened by Sir David Attenborough

Lucy + Jorge Orta at the new wing of Attenborough Arts Centre, opened by Sir David Attenborough

British born Lucy Orta, and her Argentinian husband Jorge Orta are artists with a huge social conscience. Their multidisciplinary works that combine sculpture, sound, printmaking, fashion, photography, installation and performance to engage in the critical issues surrounding the ecology of our planet. They tackle environmental issues such as the lack...
Nikolai Astrup - Norway's Forgotten Painter

Nikolai Astrup – Norway’s Forgotten Painter

It is likely that you have heard of Edvard Munch. If you have not heard of him, you are likely to have heard of his most famous artwork, The Scream; and if that doesn’t jog your memory, the image would certainly be familiar Whilst Munch was painting the finishes touches...
Painting the Modern Garden – A Bourgeois Utopia

Painting the Modern Garden – A Bourgeois Utopia

The Royal Academy’s recently opened exhibition, Painting the Modern Garden: Monet to Matisse, is aesthetically stunning, however, its true beauty lies within the encrypted messages hidden beneath the surfaces of the 120 exhibited canvases. Superficially, the exhibition, arranged thematically into nine rooms, details the role of the private leisure garden...
Shore Projects: Bespoke Watch Combination Bar

Shore Projects: Bespoke Watch Combination Bar

At a recent exclusive VIP launch event at Soho house, we discovered up and coming brand Shore Projects. The idea first came about in the hands of a group of close friends in search of a classic, durable and simple British look in their watches. Clearly, they had spotted a...
Miss Hokusai review: a bizarre but beautiful journey

Miss Hokusai review: a bizarre but beautiful journey

  The Great Wave off Kanagawa by Katsushika Hokusai is one of Japan’s most recognisable artworks, almost synonymous with the country’s history. Despite that pedigree, Miss Hokusai does not take the esteemed painter as its focus,  but is about his equally talented daughter, their relationship, and the art they have...
The Bull Inn, Sussex

The Bull Inn, Sussex

Nestled in the foothills of the Sussex Downs, just a few miles from Brighton and the beautiful Sussex coast, is The Bull Inn – an idyllic country pub, bookable through the website Inn Places. It’s quintessentially cosy; everything you could want downstairs from a large log fire to comfy sofas and...
Trumbo review: flashy, fun Hollywood biopic

Trumbo review: flashy, fun Hollywood biopic

Trumbo is the fun, pacy, and rather insubstantial story of Hollywood screenwriter Dalton Trumbo’s struggle to be recognised for his work despite his political beliefs, battling betrayal from other film industry communists, time in prison, family conflict, artistic compromise, and oscillation between wealth and bankruptcy. Blacklisted for his communist politics,...
Brydon Brothers: The Only Belt You'll Ever Need

Brydon Brothers: The Only Belt You’ll Ever Need

Every year in fashion you have the stand outs, the pieces that really define the season – Burberry’s AW14 monogrammed capes are an example, or however skinny and rock-fuelled Hedi Slimane has decided we should be under our Saint Laurent biker jackets – and then there are the things that...
Burleigh – The British Pottery Company Fighting Back

Burleigh – The British Pottery Company Fighting Back

Staffordshire is a microcosm representative of pockets of industry throughout the United Kingdom. During the nineteenth century these industrious towns up and down the country flourished on coal, textiles, ceramics and so on, yet as the industrial revolution died down and production slowly moved abroad for cheaper labour and land,...
Ditchling Museum of Art + Craft - The Home of British Arts and Crafts

Ditchling Museum of Art + Craft – The Home of British Arts and Crafts

Nestled in the beautiful surroundings of East Sussex, some 8 miles in land from Brighton at the foothills of the South Downs, lies the inordinately pretty village of Ditchling. Because of its proximity to both London and the coast, as well as its idyllic surroundings, it was chosen by the...
Craig David at The Electric Ballroom

Craig David at The Electric Ballroom

It seems 2016 is going to be Craig David’s year. After a series of surprise appearances, including teaming up with BBC UK Garage spoof People Just Do Nothing, and covering Justin Bieber songs for BBC Radio 1’s Live Lounge, Craig is back in the spotlight after almost a decade of...
50 Days by Albert Adrià at Cafe Royal

50 Days by Albert Adrià at Cafe Royal

Café Royal, member of The Set hotels, is set to occupy London’s gastronomic scene for the next ten weeks with renowned chef Albert Adrià’s 50 days residency, marking the five star luxury hotel’s 150th anniversary. For a limited-time only, the Domino Restaurant and prestigious Oscar Wilde Bar will welcome culinary royalty...
Deep Red on Blu-ray: grisly giallo gore

Deep Red on Blu-ray: grisly giallo gore

Deep Red (or Profondo Rosso, to use its infinitely more ominous Italian title) is rightly regarded as one of the seminal works of Italian giallo maestro Dario Argento – still best known for Suspiria – and one of horror’s pivotal works. Pianist Marcus Daly (David Hemmings) is the unfortunate eye...
Spotlight review: simple, powerful investigative thriller

Spotlight review: simple, powerful investigative thriller

There’s a quiet power to Spotlight, an investigative journalism thriller that has the confidence to ditch the melodrama, step back and just let its story do the hard work. Under the influence of a new editor, in 2001 The Boston Globe began a lengthy investigation into allegations that the Catholic...
Restaurant Review: The Colony Club, Mayfair

Restaurant Review: The Colony Club, Mayfair

High-end restaurants that cater for different types of cuisines in the same kitchen are a very rare breed in London. One such venue is The Colony Club in Mayfair, which offers 6 different expertly prepared cuisines. The restaurant and bar is situated above the ground floor in the Colony Club’s casino....
ZSL Animal Photography Prize Exhibition

ZSL Animal Photography Prize Exhibition

The ZSL London Zoo is the oldest scientific zoo, having opened in 1828. In recent decades it has become increasingly difficulty for zoos to maintain positive PR. They have come under attack for their treatment of animals – there is a lack of empathy for anyone who puts a wild...
Singapore’s art scene - Art for the sake of what?

Singapore’s art scene – Art for the sake of what?

Singapore’s art scene is finally freeing itself from financial markets – Candid’s resident Asian Arts correspondent Peter Schmike investigates. When Singapore became an independent country 50 years ago, the prospects for success seemed very gloomy. However, the young nation has transformed into the economic powerhouse of Southeast Asia by strategic...
Angelo Savelli - Basically White

Angelo Savelli – Basically White

Basically… yes. A gem surrounded by other treasures such as Alexander McQueen and Tiffany’s on Old Bond Street, M&L Fine Art has succeeded in curating an exhibition that not only encapsulates the most visually relevant work of an artist, but contextualises it with that of others in his era. To...
Russell Young's Superstar at Halcyon Gallery - dazzling yet dangerous

Russell Young’s Superstar at Halcyon Gallery – dazzling yet dangerous

The Halcyon Gallery is one of the superstars of its generation – it knows its market perfectly – it has the taste of its clientele down to a T. It’s not everyone’s tastes, with their art quite often being the 3 B’s (Big, bold and brash). But it works, and...
Liima at The EDITION Hotel

Liima at The EDITION Hotel

  Liima are the most exciting thing to come out of the Nordic music scene in recent years. A recent gig at The EDITION Hotel Basement in London proved just how exciting and energetic lo-fi can be. Their set twisted and turned through melodic ripples, in the intimate space, with...
The Big Short review: chaotic financial farce

The Big Short review: chaotic financial farce

Based on the book of the same name, The Big Short follows four denizens of the high-finance world as they predict – and ultimately seek to profit from – the 2007-2008 housing market crash. Whilst the big banks, the media and the government are greedily blinded by the glare of...
Bar Review: The Gibson, Shoreditch

Bar Review: The Gibson, Shoreditch

It’d be fair to say that there’s some understandable pressure surrounding the opening of The Gibson. EC1’s latest trendy cocktail bar comes from Marian Beke, formerly bar manager at Nightjar, just down the road, for five years. Nightjar quickly became one of London’s most talked about bars, earning cred not...
London Art Fair - Candid Magazine's top things to see and do

London Art Fair – Candid Magazine’s top things to see and do

It is hard to believe that the London Art Fair is now in its 28th year. The Modern and Contemporary British art fair continues to feel fresh and exciting – as well as impeccably curated – and its 2016 incarnation is no exception. Here are a few of the must-see...
The Assassin review: meditative, matchless filmmaking

The Assassin review: meditative, matchless filmmaking

The Assassin is a film of curious restraint, and perhaps a perfect expression of the power such restraint offers. Opening with a prologue shot in black and white, with a constrictive, boxed-in aspect ratio, Hou Hsiao-Hsien’s film takes its time before bursting into rapturous colour, the screen awash with rich...
Opening: 100 Wardour Street, Soho

Opening: 100 Wardour Street, Soho

January is set to end on a high note with the launch of new lounge and club 100 Wardour Street in what was once the renowned Marquee Club, which, between 1964 and 1988, hosted pop and rock legends such as Jimi Hendrix, Rolling Stones and Fleetwood Mac. Opening on Thursday 28th...
Alejandro Iñárritu interview: 'I would not change anything'

Alejandro Iñárritu interview: ‘I would not change anything’

Alejandro Iñárritu has a lot to be pleased about when we meet at Claridge’s to discuss his latest film, harrowing frontiers survival epic The Revenant. The visually spectacular film is the tale of frontiersman Hugh Glass (Leonardo DiCaprio), mauled by a grizzly bear and left for dead in the frozen...
LCM AW16 Round Up: Candid's Verdict

LCM AW16 Round Up: Candid’s Verdict

Back to work after the Christmas break and straight into London Collections: Men the same week is now the norm for us fashion types, but it doesn’t make it any easier. We require a good old shake to wake us out of our turkey-induced daze and make us fail in...
The Revenant review: jaw-dropping sensory overload

The Revenant review: jaw-dropping sensory overload

‘Gruelling’ is one of the few words that almost adequately describes The Revenant, in which Leonardo DiCaprio fights through 200 miles of frozen North American wilderness in pursuit of bloody vengeance. Birdman director Alejando G. Iñárritu is back with his latest effort at Academy gold, this time loosely adapting the true story...
Heman Chong – An Arm, A Leg and Other Stories at SLG

Heman Chong – An Arm, A Leg and Other Stories at SLG

South London Gallery is a small but perfectly formed bastion for the contemporary arts. Its latest show, by the artist Heman Chong, is an exploration of exchange – how ideas and information are passed consciously and unconsciously between participators. The main room of the gallery exhibits a piece entitled Monument...
Restaurant Review: The Modern Pantry, Finsbury Sq.

Restaurant Review: The Modern Pantry, Finsbury Sq.

There’s nothing more modern than multiculturalism, at least if The Modern Pantry Finsbury Square is anything to go by. The London-born restaurant’s take on contemporary cuisine draws influence (and ingredients) from across the globe, smashing them together in a sort of intercontinental hodgepodge that works far more often than it...
Four Seasons Hotel Hampshire

Four Seasons Hotel Hampshire

Clouds advanced over a ripple of green hills, the horizon flecked with silhouettes of barren trees. We made our way through Hampshire, home to boundless parks, quaint villages and the New Forest, surrounded by postcard views of British countryside in winter; bleak and beautiful all at once. In the distance,...
Lee Miller: A Woman’s War at the Imperial War Museum, London

Lee Miller: A Woman’s War at the Imperial War Museum, London

Lee Miller’s career was by any standards extraordinary. But it was also beset by contradictions – one of the most fundamental being that the Second World War, though it gave her the opportunity to become a supremely talented and courageous war correspondent and photojournalist, left her emotionally and physically exhausted,...
Creed review: a boxing drama with heart

Creed review: a boxing drama with heart

Creed is the seventh movie in the Rocky franchise (now apparently called the ‘Rocky legacy’), but it is by no means a cash-in.  This is a strong film with a script, acting and cinematography that hit all the right marks, standing tall on its own merits rather than merely trading...
Restaurant Review: Dishoom, Carnaby Street

Restaurant Review: Dishoom, Carnaby Street

If you don’t typically crave Indian food the moment you wake up, then you probably haven’t been to Dishoom for breakfast. Dishoom “from Bombay with love” pays homage to the Irani cafés that populated Bombay (now Mumbai) in the 1960’s and have since diminished, much to the dismay of locals....
Aristide Najean's glass sculptures - a new modernity in chandeliers

Aristide Najean’s glass sculptures – a new modernity in chandeliers

When one thinks of Venetian glass, images of grand pastel coloured chandeliers I strict symmetrical forms are what usually comes to mind. However one man, Aristide Najean has set out on a mission to literally smash the mould. Chandeliers are objects of both form and function – they represent as...
Thyme Hotel, Cotswolds

Thyme Hotel, Cotswolds

Since Kate Moss’s fairy-tale wedding was leaked to the papers in 2011, the beautiful village of Southrop has found itself at the centre of Cotswold’s cool, and Thyme along with it. First launched as an “exclusive use” eight-bedroom, 17th century country house on the sweeping Southrop Manor Estate (owned by the...
Joy review: Jennifer Lawrence props up a flat drama

Joy review: Jennifer Lawrence props up a flat drama

Director David O. Russell is back once again with his dream team of Jennifer Lawrence and Bradley Cooper, this time throwing the pair into the true story of Joy Mangano, frustrated housewife turned millionaire inventor of the Miracle Mop. Even before the first shot Russell is quick to establish the...
Winter Cocktails at The Vault, Milroy's of Soho

Winter Cocktails at The Vault, Milroy’s of Soho

  There are speakeasies, and then there’s The Vault at Milroy’s of Soho. While there’s no doubt that London has been blessed with an abundance of these clandestine drinking dens over the last few years, their selling point has traditionally been seclusion and secrecy. But in this rather crowded marketplace, The Vault is one establishment...
The Danish Girl review: Alicia Vikander dominates mannered drama

The Danish Girl review: Alicia Vikander dominates mannered drama

The Danish Girl arrives in cinemas with no shortage of baggage. Director Tom Hooper is hoping to replicate the back-to-back critical and commercial successes of The King’s Speech and Les Misérables. Leads in the film will help with that: Eddie Redmayne is fresh from Best Actor wins at the Oscars,...
Restaurant Review: Bombay Brasserie, Kensington

Restaurant Review: Bombay Brasserie, Kensington

Indian cuisine in the U.K. might still dominated by the takeaway – greasy naan and a chicken tikka masala are some of the first things that come to mind for most – but that’s not to say that fine Indian dining is scarce in the city. Enter Kensington’s Bombay Brasserie...
In the Heart of the Sea review: lightweight Moby-Dick tribute act

In the Heart of the Sea review: lightweight Moby-Dick tribute act

It’s man vs. nature in Ron Howard’s grisly survival epic In the Heart of the Sea, which pits a motley crew of whalers up against the biggest, meanest whale this side of Free Willy – and a couple thousand miles worth of the Pacific Ocean. Thor and Spider-Man share some screen...
The Royal Horseguards Hotel, London

The Royal Horseguards Hotel, London

The Royal Horseguards Hotel in London exudes British charm. The building – despite being based on a French Chateau – feels every bit the quintessential English hotel. Staff are polished and attentive, and the decor is luxurious yet understated. Rooms feel refined, with sumptuous beds and high ceilings. It’s the...
JAKL review - one to watch for 2016

JAKL review – one to watch for 2016

Candid Magazine went to check out hotly tipped musician JAKL in London to see their show, and catch up with the man himself, Hughie Gavin to speak to him about the concert. London based artist JAKL has announced the upcoming release of his debut single ‘The Jackal’. The track offers the perfect insight into the...
Alexander Calder at Tate Modern - a New Modernity for Mobiles

Alexander Calder at Tate Modern – a New Modernity for Mobiles

Alexander Calder (1898-1976) was one of the truly ground-breaking artists of the 20th century and, as a pioneer of kinetic sculpture, played an essential role in shaping the history of modernism. Alexander Calder: Performing Sculpture brings together approximately 100 works to reveal how Calder turned sculpture from a static object...
Daddy's Home review: a predictable Will Ferrell comedy

Daddy’s Home review: a predictable Will Ferrell comedy

What happens when the pedantic, frustrated everyman meets his opposite, the wild, unpredictable alpha male? Exactly what happens in every other film with the same premise, according to Daddy’s Home. This end-of-the-year comedy starring Will Ferrell and Mark Wahlberg will have a hard time opening along some of the most...
Seven Stylish Last Minute Men's Christmas Gifts

Seven Stylish Last Minute Men’s Christmas Gifts

Okay, so time isn’t on your side, but when is it ever? The man who has everything is the last one on your Christmas shopping list, and you’re stumped. iTunes vouchers seem like such a cop out – and they are, however useful – but you can’t face another aimless...
Restaurant Review: Bó Drake, Soho

Restaurant Review: Bó Drake, Soho

Bó Drake is one of the more unusual additions to the crowded restaurant scene on Greek Street in Soho. You might not normally associate BBQ with east Asian countries, and even the most well-travelled food lover would struggle to name a similar restaurant in London. Bó Drake has a particularly...
Star Wars: The Force Awakens review: dizzying, joyous and triumphant

Star Wars: The Force Awakens review: dizzying, joyous and triumphant

Carrying with it an almost suffocating weight of expectation, Star Wars: The Force Awakens might be the most anticipated film since The Phantom Menace stumbled into cinemas, slurring as it went about its disappointing way. There’s no small thrill then in reporting that Episode VII sees the series back at...
Neville Salon's Charity Event for Nepal

Neville Salon’s Charity Event for Nepal

Londoners gathered at Neville Salon on the 3rd of December to support “Neville for Nepal,” a dedicated charity event. Neville Salon, a beauty mecca located in Belgravia, welcomed guests for an evening of pampering and prosecco, including haircuts, manicures, blow-dries, and more at discounted rates. All proceeds from the event benefitted the Early Childhood Development...
Lifestyle Christmas Wish List 2015

Lifestyle Christmas Wish List 2015

Ah, Christmas: you spend all year wanting things that you probably don’t need, and when the festive fervour arrives, you’ve suddenly forgotten them all. To spare you from racking your brains for something other than socks, here’s what we’re hankering for this season. Santa: take note (please).   Icons of Men’s...
The Forbidden Room review: bonkers and genius

The Forbidden Room review: bonkers and genius

Guy Maddin claims he has “finally figured it out, this filmmaking business.” The writer and director has made eleven feature-length films but it is his latest, The Forbidden Room, that seems to have brought a long, diverse career to an ecstatic high. Will this be the exhausted but triumphant hilt...
Hanbury Manor: A British Retreat in Hertfordshire

Hanbury Manor: A British Retreat in Hertfordshire

Nestled among 200 acres of rolling Hertfordshire countryside, the Hanbury Manor Marriott Hotel & Country Club is an idyllic and ideal setting for those wanting to escape city living. Breathtaking views surround the five-star, stately manor: rural countryside; fragrant, walled gardens; winding paths; and flowerbeds boasting a myriad of colours. Impeccable service,...
Candid talks to light-installation artist Aowen Jin

Candid talks to light-installation artist Aowen Jin

Aowen Jin does not fall into any pre-conceived notions you may have for an artist. There is no clichéd beret in sight and she is neither timid nor boastful about her remarkable achievements. You get exactly what you see: an enticingly intelligent woman, excited about her ideas and refreshingly open...
Art Basel Miami Beach: an NYC Curator's Experience

Art Basel Miami Beach: an NYC Curator’s Experience

It’s that time again, when the world’s leading Modern and Contemporary art galleries, artists and art fanatics alike descend upon Miami. This will mark the 14th edition of Art Basel Miami Beach – which continues to be the most distinguished art fair in the western hemisphere – with 267 galleries all...
Mad About The Boy: A New Exhibition

Mad About The Boy: A New Exhibition

Mad About The Boy Fashion’s obsession with youth transcends fads. It isn’t confined to just a handful of young designers who like to imagine they are dressing themselves, and is present at the pinnacle of luxury fashion. From Hedi Slimane’s Saint Laurent to Saint Martin’s graduate shows, the teenage boy...
Krampus review: frustratingly flat Christmas creature feature

Krampus review: frustratingly flat Christmas creature feature

Screenwriter Michael Dougherty makes his directorial follow-up to 2007’s Trick ‘r Treat in Krampus, once again delivering a dark, comedic horror that takes glee in drawing out the darker side of the season. Much as Trick ‘r Treat explored the threat lurking beneath some familiar Halloween rituals, Krampus finds a...
Anne Hardy's 'FIELD' is a new, immersively compelling installation

Anne Hardy’s ‘FIELD’ is a new, immersively compelling installation

Modern Art Oxford has been a bastion for contemporary art outside of the London bubble. Celebrating its 50th anniversary next year, the gallery pulls a roster of acclaimed artists under the leadership of its current Director, Paul Hobson, to take over the city-centre space drawing even the hardiest of crowds...
Lucien Freud - A Closer Look at Louisiana Museum of Modern Art, Denmark - A touching insight

Lucien Freud – A Closer Look at Louisiana Museum of Modern Art, Denmark – A touching insight

The Louisiana Museum of Modern Art in Denmark recently showed a collection of etchings by one of the greatest British artists of the last century – Lucien Freud. The etchings give a heart-warming insight in to Freud’s charming mentality and affection for his sitters through carefully crafted lines that circumscribe...
Artist and Empire at Tate Britain - Imperial Art at it's best

Artist and Empire at Tate Britain – Imperial Art at it’s best

With the opening of the Tate Britain’s winter exhibition, Artist and Empire, Britain’s rather shady Imperial past is thrown firmly back into the limelight. While Imperial art traces a journey of cultural awakening and appropriation we may not be entirely proud of, it nonetheless is a journey that has profoundly...
Hugh L. Beattie – ‘London Ancient & Modern’

Hugh L. Beattie – ‘London Ancient & Modern’

Hugh Beattie’s recent paintings, currently exhibited at the Royal Opera Arcade in Mayfair, are a paean to the creative and enterprising spirit of London. There are few other cities in the world that have such a long history and yet are so open to bold, cutting edge architectural projects; the...
Sunset Song review: uncontrived and uncompromising

Sunset Song review: uncontrived and uncompromising

Sunset Song sounds unbearably quaint: the title is saccharine and practically nonsensical, and the trailer doesn’t help – all gold scroll-like font, tinkling music and a prettification of the Scottish countryside. Both belie the film’s real beauty and force. Terence Davies’s film is an adaptation of a 1932 novel by...
Restaurant Review: Jar Kitchen, Covent Garden

Restaurant Review: Jar Kitchen, Covent Garden

A cosy, comforting island nestled between Covent Garden and Holborn, Jar Kitchen is a refreshingly down-to-earth restaurant that opened earlier this year in May. True to its name, jars are a prominent element of the décor, whether used for storage or re-purposed as lampshades and tealight holders. Stripped wooden floors...
Garcon Jon shoots The Leisure Club by Original Penguin

Garcon Jon shoots The Leisure Club by Original Penguin

Continuing their partnership with celebrated British photographer, Jonathan Daniel Pryce, and Chris Benns, Hunger Magazine’s fashion editor, Original Penguin launches the Leisure Club collection. Selecting five creative who are leaders in their particular fields, contributing to London’s creative scene, was the starting point for Pryce and Benns to showcase this...
Bridge of Spies review: impeccably produced Cold War drama

Bridge of Spies review: impeccably produced Cold War drama

It’d be unfair to claim that Steven Spielberg has been making bad films over the past decade or so, at least if we choose to be merciful and forget (though not forgive) the huge misfire of the fourth Indiana Jones. However, what’s striking about his recent filmography is the absence...
Seven Dials and St. Martin's Courtyard Christmas Shopping event  in London

Seven Dials and St. Martin’s Courtyard Christmas Shopping event in London

London’s leading shopping destinations Seven Dials and St Martin’s Courtyard are hosting an exclusive, free shopping party on Thursday 3rd December. For one night only between 5-9pm, over 100-fashion stores, beauty brands, hotels, bars and restaurants will offer a 20% discount as well as a mixture of free experiential activities....
The Happy Hippo Family bring Swedish rock to London

The Happy Hippo Family bring Swedish rock to London

Last Wednesday The Happy Hippo Family came all the way over from Sweden to perform two sets in London. The Swedish band brought their cool vibes to the Old Queen’s Head, where they played an energetic and cheerful set, which included their new single Two Blocks Down. The Happy Hippo...
Peter Blake: Portraits and People at Waddington Custot Galleries

Peter Blake: Portraits and People at Waddington Custot Galleries

While you might know him for his iconic cover design for the Beatles’ Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band album, British artist Peter Blake’s career expands well beyond this emblem of the 1960s. Though he is often called a Pop artist, Blake has turned his hand equally successfully to realist...
Black Mass review: Johnny Depp returns to frightening form

Black Mass review: Johnny Depp returns to frightening form

There’s nary a silly hat in sight in Black Mass, widely touted as Johnny Depp’s return to form. After a recent filmography that’s been more miss than hit, it’s refreshing to see the character actor set frivolousness to the side and take relish in a truly dark turn – though...
'A Year in Paper' at The Beaumont Hotel

‘A Year in Paper’ at The Beaumont Hotel

When The Beaumont appeared on London’s hotel scene last November, we knew it wasn’t just any old place. Perhaps it was the quiet sophistication of the interiors, perhaps the stark addition of Anthony Gormley’s one-off sculptural suite. A year on, The Beaumont has proven its commitment to innovation and old-world...
British Fashion Awards 2015: The Winners

British Fashion Awards 2015: The Winners

It was a definitely a night of celebration for British fashion at last night’s British Fashion Awards, for one designer in particular. J.W. Anderson scooped both the menswear and womenswear designer of the year awards, marking a stand out year for the Northern Irish designer, who also helms Spanish label,...
Restaurant Review: Four Hundred Rabbits, Crystal Palace

Restaurant Review: Four Hundred Rabbits, Crystal Palace

Sometimes, simple pleasures are the best, and it’s easy to think that the founders of new restaurant Four Hundred Rabbits agree. Pizza, beer and ice cream aren’t always seen as the most sophisticated culinary exploits, but when done well, they’re undeniably hard to beat. And Four Hundred Rabbits does them...
Titian to Canaletto – Drawing in Venice at the Ashmolean in Oxford

Titian to Canaletto – Drawing in Venice at the Ashmolean in Oxford

Venetian art, from a historical perspective, has a reputation for being bright, bold and dramatic. Many of the best Renaissance artists emerged from the palazzo filled lagoon, and helped push drama in to art to forge the Baroque. Yet the latest show at the brilliant Ashmolean Museum in Oxford starts...
Pop-up barbers Burleigh Gentlemen's Club in Soho, London

Pop-up barbers Burleigh Gentlemen’s Club in Soho, London

The famous pottery company Burleigh, are opening the Burleigh Gentlemen’s Club on Greek Street in Soho this week – and it’s a pop-up with a conscience. To coincide with Movember – the movement that has taken the upper lips of Britain’s men by storm, the store is offering wet shaves...
Love review: graphic, sentimental and occasionally moving relationship drama

Love review: graphic, sentimental and occasionally moving relationship drama

Sentiment and sex go hand in hand in Love, the fourth feature film from acclaimed director Gaspar Noé. Best known for bringing violence and depravity to the screen in Irreversible and Enter the Void, the director mostly sets his darker tendencies to the side here, offering a surprisingly sweet and...
The Hunger Games: Mockingjay - Part 2 review: a rousing, nail-biting finale

The Hunger Games: Mockingjay – Part 2 review: a rousing, nail-biting finale

The Hunger Games finale arrives with aplomb, showcasing its two main strengths, innovative deaths and political commentary, all wrapped around a teen romance. For those who haven’t kept up to date with the films (or books), Mockingjay – Part 2 centres around Katniss Everdeen (Jennifer Lawrence), who has unwittingly become the face...
Mad Hatter's Afternoon Tea at Sanderson

Mad Hatter’s Afternoon Tea at Sanderson

Sanderson, one of the most iconic hotels of this millennia, is as well known for its Alice in Wonderland themed afternoon tea as it is for its glittering clientele and star-studded parties. Part of Morgans Hotel Group (counting Mondrian London and the recently revamped St Martins Lane as its sister...
Aqua Kyoto’s New 'Food as Art' Menu

Aqua Kyoto’s New ‘Food as Art’ Menu

The aqua Restaurant Group has a penchant for views, specifically, for great sparkling cityscapes. Their base in Hong Kong has a panorama from a 30th floor outpost beside the harbour, while in London they have three venues on Regent Street, including aqua kyoto, and one in The Shard. And while the...
Tangerine review: a ferocious, frivolous onslaught

Tangerine review: a ferocious, frivolous onslaught

Wending its way through a sun-drenched, sleazy West Hollywood, Tangerine is a one-trans-woman mission to track down her philandering, affianced pimp. Just out of jail, as the holiday season reaches its height, Sin-Dee Rella (Kitana Kiki Rodriguez) goes hard. When her long-suffering friend Alexandra (Mya Taylor) let’s slip about Sin...
Exhibition On Screen launches ‘Goya - Visions of Flesh and Blood’

Exhibition On Screen launches ‘Goya – Visions of Flesh and Blood’

Open-air screenings of opera and ballet have become something of a summer event. With their popularity clear to see from the crowds gathered in Trafalgar Square, it is no wonder that the National Gallery should jump on board. They first collaborated with Exhibition On Screen back in 2012 to film...
The Hallow review: lean, tense modern horror

The Hallow review: lean, tense modern horror

Setting aside the Leprechaun franchise (though why anyone would ever want to set aside treasures like Leprechaun: Back 2 tha Hood is beyond me), Irish folklore remains curiously untapped by the film industry, and it’s with that in mind that Corin Hardy took to it for his debut feature, The...
Lalique and Patrón: a most sophisticated tequila

Lalique and Patrón: a most sophisticated tequila

  Think “tequila,” and you might recall debaucherous nights with blurred edges and a salt and citrus aftertaste. But we like to think we’ve grown up, and so too has our old friend – well, Mexico’s premier tequila distiller Patrón certainly has done anyway. A partnership with Lalique, masters of...
An interview with the artist Rebecca Grant

An interview with the artist Rebecca Grant

Rebecca Grant is a woman in high demand. She’s currently starring in the hit play “Dinner with Saddam” at the Menier Chocolate Factory and I caught up with her coming off the stage. Rebecca is a singer, dancer, and actress, but she is more than just a triple threat. She...
The Amazing World of MC Escher, Dulwich Picture Gallery

The Amazing World of MC Escher, Dulwich Picture Gallery

Organisation of the work of MC Escher is a highly intriguing concept, and one that I imagine the curators of this touring show took extremely cautiously, as the work itself defiantly avoids classification. At the start of the exhibition, on now at Dulwich Picture Gallery, the introductory panel states that...
Mission Bar & Woodford Reserve's Olive Oil Old Fashioned

Mission Bar & Woodford Reserve’s Olive Oil Old Fashioned

Daunting concept aside, the Olive Oil Old Fashioned is a surprisingly easy drink to get along with. It’s one of the latest creations of Marcis Dzelzainis, the head bartender at Bethnal Green’s Mission, and formerly of fine cocktail pedigree including 69 Colebrooke Row and Satan’s Whiskers, just around the corner...
Brooklyn review: immaculately acted, cloyingly sentimental

Brooklyn review: immaculately acted, cloyingly sentimental

In one scene in Brooklyn, a young woman, Eilis, (Saoirse Ronan) goes to lay flowers on the grave of a loved one.  The music swells; the shot lingers for one second too long, perhaps, on the bunches of violets on the ground; and the camera gets so close to Ronan’s...
Kill Your Friends review: desperate to shock

Kill Your Friends review: desperate to shock

Based on the novel of the same name, Kill Your Friends is an interesting peek into the music industry and the representatives who are trusted to find the latest hit. What you find is a mix of alcohol, drugs, debauchery, murder, blackmail and somewhere in between someone makes a song....
Limor Gottlieb in conversation with the artist Secundino Hernández

Limor Gottlieb in conversation with the artist Secundino Hernández

Everyone Wants A Piece Of Secundino Hernández. The artist’s career is taking off fast, and his work has attracted strong international interest over the past years. Over the course of his career, Secundino Hernández developed his style – a mix of action painting that elicits former artistic works from El...
Drawing Blood: Graham Humphreys' macabre posters find new life

Drawing Blood: Graham Humphreys’ macabre posters find new life

Graham Humphreys draws blood. Lots of it. With poster designs for horror classics The Evil Dead and A Nightmare on Elm Street, along with countless B-movie gore fests, he’s made his name for himself as an illustrator of viscera. Surveying the current exhibition of his work at Proud Galleries in...
Under Milk Wood review: a striking, stylised adaptation

Under Milk Wood review: a striking, stylised adaptation

“To begin at the beginning: It is spring, moonless night in the small town, starless and bible-black, the cobblestreets silent and the hunched, courters’-and-rabbits’ wood limping invisible down to the sloeblack, slow, black, crowblack, fishingboatbobbing sea.” Under Milk Wood was written as a BBC radio play in 1954 by legendary...
Old Harry Captains Our Favourite Autumn Knitwear

Old Harry Captains Our Favourite Autumn Knitwear

British brand Old Harry only does one thing; knitwear. Doing one thing perfectly was their aim when they launched this autumn, inspired by the British seaside. Their first collection, for both men and women, is designed in Britain and made with 100% high quality cotton, perfect for those days that...
Frank Auberach at Marlborough Fine Art

Frank Auberach at Marlborough Fine Art

With a highly appraised retrospective currently open at the Tate Britain – the first major exhibition to showcase Frank Auerbach’s work since A New Spirit in Painting at the Royal Academy in 2001, and an exhibition running simultaneously at Marlborough Fine Art, the humble artist, known within the art world...
John Armstrong: Paintings 1938-1958 - An Enchanted Distance at Piano Nobile

John Armstrong: Paintings 1938-1958 – An Enchanted Distance at Piano Nobile

John Armstrong’s paintings are an enigma. Over a period in which many artists turned to abstraction, Armstrong remained firmly figurative, yet his spaces are hard to define and his symbolism elusive. Perhaps best known for his participation in the short-lived movement ‘Unit One’, founded by Paul Nash along with Barbara...
Rachel Maggart's New Britannia: Reinventing British Iconography - a punk two fingers up at painting metaphors

Rachel Maggart’s New Britannia: Reinventing British Iconography – a punk two fingers up at painting metaphors

New Britannia: Reinventing British Iconography is a series of ten painted collages on display from 12 October at Roast Restaurant in Borough Market by Rachel Maggart. Born in Rochester, NY, but raised in Knoxville TN, and educated in Dallas TX, Paris, France, and New York City, Rachel had a unconventional route...
Candid's top ten things to do in Paris during FIAC

Candid’s top ten things to do in Paris during FIAC

For those of you who haven’t had enough of art after Frieze week in London, and have hopped on over to Paris for the French equivalent, FIAC (Fiore Internationale d’Art Contemporain), Candid Magazine have compiled our handy  guide of ten things to do around town to give you a break...
Spectre review: classic Bond brought into the modern day

Spectre review: classic Bond brought into the modern day

Brash, muscular and operatic in scale, Spectre is a Bond film roaring with confidence, but masking some uncomfortable flaws that separate it from the character’s best. An extraordinary opening sequence set during Mexico City’s Day of the Dead celebrations quickly establishes director Sam Mendes’ lofty ambitions. A long tracking shot follows...
Listen to Me Marlon review: a hypnotic, heartbreaking documentary

Listen to Me Marlon review: a hypnotic, heartbreaking documentary

Crafted primarily from audio recordings made throughout his lifetime, Listen to Me Marlon is a rare thing: a posthumous, autobiographical documentary, as Marlon Brando details his life and career in his own words. Brando’s recordings come from a collection of hundreds of hours of personal audio diaries, offering a frank...
Camden Arts Centre ‘Edgelands’ exhibition - Ben Rivers

Camden Arts Centre ‘Edgelands’ exhibition – Ben Rivers

Having been so widely exhibited within the last year at high profile locations including the British Film Institute, BBC Television Centre, Kate MacGarry, and now this large-scale show at Camden Arts Centre, Ben Rivers is using the environmental crisis in which we find ourselves as the conduit for his poignant,...
First Impression – An Exhibition by Edward Akrout at Hoxtown Gallery

First Impression – An Exhibition by Edward Akrout at Hoxtown Gallery

Guests gathered under fairy lights whilst sipping gin cocktails on the garden patio of the effortlessly cool Hoxton Hotel in London – the creative crowd had turned out in support of actor and artist Edward Akrout at the opening of his latest exhibition First Impression at Hoxtown Gallery. The corridors...
Candid Magazine visits the studio of artist Eloise Dorr

Candid Magazine visits the studio of artist Eloise Dorr

London based artist Eloise Dorr has been creating paintings and prints from her studio for a hip counter-culture crowd for years now. Influenced largely by skate culture, she is widely known for using skateboards as her canvases. Her images are colourful and fun – charming illustrations of a shadowy figure having...
James Long x MCM's Collaboration Has Landed

James Long x MCM’s Collaboration Has Landed

Not since 2007, when Dolce & Gabbana sent its men down the runway to the soundtrack of 2001: A Space Odyssey in white and silver astronaut suits, have we lusted so much over some space-age streetwear – until now. British designer James Long has teamed up with German, leather-goods maker...
MULTIPLIED 2015: Contemporary Editions Fair - Christie’s, 16-18 October

MULTIPLIED 2015: Contemporary Editions Fair – Christie’s, 16-18 October

MULTIPLIED, ‘the UK’s only fair dedicated to contemporary art in editions’, is now in its sixth year. It has quietly established itself as a respected satellite of Frieze (thirteen this year), fulfilling an important function in the art world calendar. For while the majority of Frieze visitors go only to...
Kate MacGarry and Peter McDonald at Frieze - the magic of the one artist booth

Kate MacGarry and Peter McDonald at Frieze – the magic of the one artist booth

In a few hours of this being written, the curtains will be closing on another week of London art fair crazy, as it shifts itself over to Paris for FIAC and another few days of hard selling. Before we kiss goodbye it’d be good to take a few minutes to...
Steve Jobs review: stylish but self-aggrandizing biopic

Steve Jobs review: stylish but self-aggrandizing biopic

Windows devotees will find much to appreciate in Steve Jobs – slick, stylish and ultimately devoid of much substance, it has much in common with Apple products as described by their fiercest critics. Director Danny Boyle partners with screenwriter Aaron Sorkin for this unusually structured biopic, which captures the Apple...
Candid Loves... Mallet Footwear

Candid Loves… Mallet Footwear

There is no doubting that the British footwear market has seen a shift to a more casual aesthetic, Nike’s Huarache and Adidas’s Yeezy being the most cult of recent times. Skate styles are now worn in the boardroom as well as the halfpipe, while New Balance – not necessarily British but...
Fierce Festival, Birmingham - Live art, collision, hyperlocal and supernow.

Fierce Festival, Birmingham – Live art, collision, hyperlocal and supernow.

Now in its sixth year under current artistic directors Laura Mcdermott and Harun Morrison (but originally founded by Mark Ball), Fierce Festival is a contemporary art festival based across multiple venues throughout Birmingham. Artists from all over the work have been carefully selected and curated with a focus on four...
Carol review: sumptuous but emotionally empty romance

Carol review: sumptuous but emotionally empty romance

At times during Carol, Todd Haynes’ film adaptation of the Patricia Highsmith novel, Rooney Mara strikingly recalls Audrey Hepburn. She is captivating throughout and, judged on celluloid charisma alone, deserves a prize for being one of the very few who can outshine the impeccably beautiful Cate Blanchett on screen. Both...
Moniker Art Fair and Patrón Tequila

Moniker Art Fair and Patrón Tequila

Now in its sixth year, Moniker Art Fair in East London’s Old Truman Brewery is becoming a firm fixture during the week in October when the good, the bad and the ugly descend on London for a heady mix of fairs, exhibitions, auctions and parties. Moniker shares its premises with The...
Keith Sonnier, ‘Light Works’, MAMAC (Musée d’Art Moderne et d’Art Contemporain) Nice, France. 

Keith Sonnier, ‘Light Works’, MAMAC (Musée d’Art Moderne et d’Art Contemporain) Nice, France. 

Famously, Post-Impressionist painters flocked to the south of France in search of the area’s unique late summer light. Today, there’s a similar reason to head south: an important exhibition of over thirty light-based artworks by American artist Keith Sonnier. ‘Light Works’ at Nice’s MAMAC (Musée d’Art Moderne et d’Art Contemporain)...
Frank Auerbach at The Tate - a Tour de Force

Frank Auerbach at The Tate – a Tour de Force

I’ll bet you’ve heard, at one point or another, of some cinematic masterpiece praised as a tour de force; a defining role. Well, Frank Auerbach is a one man show. And the exhibition at Tate Britain is certainly a tour de force. Moreover, his painings define him and are an...
La Musica at Young Vic, London

La Musica at Young Vic, London

Originally a play written by a classic figure in the world of existentialist literature, Marguerite Duras, La Musica can now be seen in this contemporary, 21st century incarnation thanks to Jeff James at London’s Young Vic theatre. In terms of what the play relates to, without wanting to give too...
The Lobster review: a precise and hilarious satire

The Lobster review: a precise and hilarious satire

The Lobster is the bold, striking English-language debut of Greek satirist Yorgos Lanthimos. At once cynical, cutting and violent, it also indulges in moments of sweetness and endearingly off-beat sense of humour. Colin Farrell is David, whose wife has just left him. Now single, he must enter The Hotel, a...
The Witch review: taut, stylish, vicious horror

The Witch review: taut, stylish, vicious horror

The Salem Witch Trials were a shocking demonstration of what happens when fear and suspicion run rampant. The Witch is a shocking demonstration of what happens when that fear and suspicion turn out to be all too well-founded. The directorial debut of Robert Eggers, this Sundance favourite is an intense, unrelenting...
Room review: harrowing and exquisite

Room review: harrowing and exquisite

What do you tell a child born into captivity, confined to a garden shed with ‘Ma’, denied access to the outside world, to all human contact beyond his mother and his captor? For Brie Larson in the astonishing Room, you make sure that he doesn’t even know there’s a world...
High-Rise review: a frustrating, fragmented failure

High-Rise review: a frustrating, fragmented failure

Acclaimed British director has once again brought his stylistic heft to bear in this adaptation of JG Ballard’s 1975 novel of the same name, but beneath the striking visuals and unsettling tone, there’s frustratingly little of substance. Tom Hiddleston is Dr. Robert Laing, the new occupant of a 25th floor...
Raffey Cassidy interview: Tomorrowland, George Clooney and driving at 13

Raffey Cassidy interview: Tomorrowland, George Clooney and driving at 13

Having just turned into a teenager, Raffey Cassidy has gone above and beyond what most thirteen-year-olds have achieved. She began her acting career in 2009 on British TV, and a few short years later she has filmed alongside Charlize Theron in Snow White and the Huntsman and now Hollywood royalty...
Peripheral Visions: A Solo Exhibition of Olga Chernysheva at GRAD London

Peripheral Visions: A Solo Exhibition of Olga Chernysheva at GRAD London

At first glance, Peripheral Visions, the solo exhibition of works by internationally acclaimed Moscow-based artist Olga Chernysheva, now on at GRAD London, looks rather…grey. On entering the show, however, our first impression of monochromatic dullness was completely reversed. The walls of this relatively new Russian art gallery, opened in 2013,...
Art Licks Weekend London 2-4 October

Art Licks Weekend London 2-4 October

Art Licks Weekend is like a treasure hunt. Now in its third year, the festival for young emerging artists, curators and project spaces organised by Holly Willats has grown exponentially to involve over ninety venues from Hackney to Deptford. I began my tour at Queens Road Peckham station where I...
Why you will want an Apple Watch, eventually.

Why you will want an Apple Watch, eventually.

As the Apple Watch undergoes its latest incarnation by French luxury house Hèrmes, Euan Plater looks into how trends in technology grow, and why we will all be wearing tech soon, even if we haven’t been won over yet. Wearable tech, whatever that actually applies to, has been the hot...
Is London The World's Fashion Tech Capital?

Is London The World’s Fashion Tech Capital?

Candid’s 11th issue, on sale now, celebrates the worlds of tech and fashion. On the day that Net-A-Porter – one of the most prominent and innovative fashion tech companies of the last decade –  who has this year merged Yoox to become Yoox Net-A-Porter Group makes its debut on the Italian...
Sotheby’s Made In Britain sale – 20th century home-grown talent - a review

Sotheby’s Made In Britain sale – 20th century home-grown talent – a review

The latest and third instalment of the biannual Sotheby’s Made In Britain sale had something for everyone. Fine Art, Prints, Sculpture, Photography, Ceramics and Design were purchased for sums between £175 and almost £100,000. A sale total of £2,369,610 was achieved, equal to that of the first auction but less...
Adidas’ Gary Aspden talks to Candid about his northern roots, Acid House parties, and staging The Stone Roses’ secret gig at Village Underground

Adidas’ Gary Aspden talks to Candid about his northern roots, Acid House parties, and staging The Stone Roses’ secret gig at Village Underground

Brand expert, consultant and designer, Gary Aspden sat down to talk to Candid recently about the influence of his northern working-class roots on shaping his career at Adidas. Rated twice as one of the top 100 most influential people in fashion by The Face Magazine, Aspden has created significant connections...
Filmmakers Chat: Ramin Bahrani and the truth that inspired humanistic thriller 99 Homes

Filmmakers Chat: Ramin Bahrani and the truth that inspired humanistic thriller 99 Homes

Hailing from North Carolina, Iranian-American filmmaker Ramin Bahrani has made a name for himself in the festival circuit with his first five films having screened at Venice, Cannes, Sundance, Berlin, Toronto and Telluride. Bahrani has won numerous awards including the “Someone to Watch” Spirit Award (Chop Shop, 2008), the critic’s...
The case of butterflies: Opera conductor Paul Wingfield, on working with the hip cousin of Glyndebourne.

The case of butterflies: Opera conductor Paul Wingfield, on working with the hip cousin of Glyndebourne.

It was all the rage in the naughties; the film industry cottoned on to the macabre trend in Japanese horror. The stories of the Heian period (794 – 1185; the last division of classical Japanese history, considered by many to be the pinnacle of the country’s artistic expression) were suddenly...
Floris – Jermyn Street, a new scent inspired by St. James's

Floris – Jermyn Street, a new scent inspired by St. James’s

  The oldest perfumer in the country, Floris, has launched a new menswear scent inspired by the iconic menswear paradise of Jermyn Street. Floris, holder of the Royal Warrant to provide toiletries to Prince Charles, has operated from the same premises on Jermyn Street for nearly 300 years and is...
TOPMAN: THIS IS DENIM

TOPMAN: THIS IS DENIM

Topman has for years now been the menswear go-to for everything from skinny suits to hoodies to cutting-edge styles that the rest of the high street has yet to catch up on. They also sell more jeans than any other men’s retailer – at least this is what I am...
Tetsumi Kudo, 22 Sep – 21 Nov 2015, Hauser & Wirth London - Discovering a beautiful dystopia

Tetsumi Kudo, 22 Sep – 21 Nov 2015, Hauser & Wirth London – Discovering a beautiful dystopia

The first thing I noticed walking into Japanese artist Tetsumi Kudo’s opening at Hauser & Wirth was a distinct plastic scent. A putrid odour of newness and artificiality, of materials man-made and industrially fabricated, like the smell of a new car’s interior. Emanating from stretches of green artificial grass covering the gallery’s interior,...
Filmmakers Chat: Anton Corbijn talks "Life"

Filmmakers Chat: Anton Corbijn talks “Life”

For an incredibly talented artist like Anton Corbijn, the move from photography to filmmaking was only going to be a matter of time. Regarded as one of the most influential photographers both in the world of music and in the world of portraiture photography, Corbijn discovered photography though his love...
Alberto Bertoldi – Clouds, a series of paintings at Moatti Masters|Contemporary – A refreshing approach to galleries.

Alberto Bertoldi – Clouds, a series of paintings at Moatti Masters|Contemporary – A refreshing approach to galleries.

Moatti Masters|Contemporary is the new venture by the established gallery-owner Emmanuel Moatti. Located on the Mount Street in Mayfair, London, it looks set to challenge the traditional gallery-format. Unhappy with the white-cube spaces of the contemporary-art world and their impersonal approach to art, and simultaneously dissatisfied at the dilating chasm...
Judy Chicago: Star Cunts & Other Attractions at Riflemaker

Judy Chicago: Star Cunts & Other Attractions at Riflemaker

  ‘Star Cunts & Other Attractions’ is a fittingly lurid title for this exhibition of Judy Chicago’s early works on display at Riflemaker in Soho. The show includes test plates from the now (in)famous The Dinner Party, alongside cooler, abstracted works from Chicago’s early flirtation with minimalism – the exhibition is a...
VIVA Arts Festival, Valetta, Malta - Contemporary art finding it's feet on the island

VIVA Arts Festival, Valetta, Malta – Contemporary art finding it’s feet on the island

Malta has a strong heritage when it comes to the arts. From some of the earliest known civilisations of idol making Bronze Age people being found on the northern island of Gozo, to Caravaggio creating his masterpiece The Beheading of John the Baptist in the Cathedral of The Knights of...
Above the stag, under the arches

Above the stag, under the arches

Underneath a railway arch in Vauxhall, nestled between garages and gyms fronted with corrugated iron doors, sits the Above The Stag theatre. It is, to date, the only full-time professional LGBT theatre in the UK, producing theatre with an emphasis on gay lives. A quick glance at their past seasons...
Julien Macdonald debuts menswear at London Fashion Week

Julien Macdonald debuts menswear at London Fashion Week

Europe’s largest meat market was an unusual choice for Julien Macdonald to stage his dazzling spring/summer 2016 show, but as the crowd of Made In Chelsea and Strictly’s finest piled in, braving the background smell of raw meat as they did, there was a few more men in the front...
Royal Academy of Arts Presents: Ai Weiwei

Royal Academy of Arts Presents: Ai Weiwei

In an age where video surveillance is increasingly compromising our personal privacy, artist Ai Weiwei speaks a universal language for our times. The penetrative artist is the focus of a major exhibition at The Royal Academy of Arts in London, opening on the 19 September 2015, and it’s his first...
Revealed at the Sofitel St James - photographs of famous artists at work

Revealed at the Sofitel St James – photographs of famous artists at work

In celebration of fifty years of French elegance, the Sofitel Hotel St James, London, is host to a small but inspirational photography exhibition curated by Pablo Picasso’s grandson, Olivier Wildmaier Picasso. In an attempt to understand the creative journey, from conception to completion, Revealed presents thirty unique photographs of some...
Fashion designer Sadie Clayton in discussion with Candid Magazine about where Fashion meets Art

Fashion designer Sadie Clayton in discussion with Candid Magazine about where Fashion meets Art

Fashion designer Sadie Clayton recently caught up with Candid Magazine to talk about her passions, her creative ideas and her ‘wearable art’ collections. Innovative fashion designer, Sadie Clayton, has garnered a significant amount of attention since she launched her first collection last year. The gifted designer has already been invited...
The World Goes Pop as Tate Modern Bursts the Bubble on Western Pop Art

The World Goes Pop as Tate Modern Bursts the Bubble on Western Pop Art

The Tate’s new offering is one of old works, but despite the walls of The World Goes Pop being filled with the art of the 60s and 70s, we are told that this is not a retrospective style offering, but a re-education of sorts. Pop Art, with its borrowed stylings...
Banksy's Dismaland - Hype can be a terrible thing

Banksy’s Dismaland – Hype can be a terrible thing

Hype can be a terrible thing. In most cases, it comes about when an event is so anticipated by the public, that visitors work up unrealistic expectations. As far as anticipation and high expectations go, Dismaland is up there. With Banksy and Damien Hirst attaching their names to the “most...
Serge DeNimes AW15: Candid Talks To Oliver Proudlock

Serge DeNimes AW15: Candid Talks To Oliver Proudlock

Candid Magazine’s fashion features editor Mikael Jack talks to Oliver Proudlock as the Serge DeNimes autumn/winter 2015 collection launches. Pop-ups are becoming something of a fixture on London’s fashion scene. The formula is usually predictable: a cool East End warehouse, former brewery or shipping container; a launch party, fuelled by...
Highlights: Chelsea College of Arts – Postgraduate Summer Show 2015

Highlights: Chelsea College of Arts – Postgraduate Summer Show 2015

Attending a student art show is always something of a mixed rag. Whilst it’s a wonderful chance to see the work of fresh-faced ‘up and coming’ artists, and get a sense of the trends, themes, and aesthetics we might expect in gallery shows over the next few years; the best...
Jennifer Rubell: Not Alone, at Stephen Friedman Gallery

Jennifer Rubell: Not Alone, at Stephen Friedman Gallery

Artist Jennifer Rubell is best known for her food performances: pieces that sometimes echo Rirkrit Tiravanija’s exercises in relational aesthetics from the nineties. In 2007 Rubell organised a huge banquet that fed 2,000, with a pair of latex gloves for each visitor alongside a hard boiled egg, and in 2009...
Carsten Höller at Southbank Centre

Carsten Höller at Southbank Centre

Deciding whether or not to brave the outside world on a particularly grey London day is a big judgment call in itself. That is not the last choice to be made if you have tickets to Carsten Höller’s Decision at the Hayward Gallery. Visitors, as well as anybody with common...
Jacques Henri Lartigue: Collecting Life in Colour, Paris

Jacques Henri Lartigue: Collecting Life in Colour, Paris

“Photographs are a way of imprisoning reality… one can’t possess reality – one can possess images”, writes American author Susan Sontag in On Photography (1977). Jacques Henri Lartigue may however have well disagreed with Sontag. The French photographer, whose coloured plates are exhibited for the first time at the Maison...
Chatsworth's – Art Out Loud Festival 2015

Chatsworth’s – Art Out Loud Festival 2015

Also known as ‘The Palace of the Peaks’, Chatsworth House in Derbyshire, home of the Duke and Duchess of Devonshire, is undoubtedly one of the country’s best-known and best-loved country houses. For many Londoners, however, making the trek to the Peak District can seem a bit much. A new event...
Elpida Hadzi-Vasileva: Fragility, at Fabrica, Brighton

Elpida Hadzi-Vasileva: Fragility, at Fabrica, Brighton

Elpida Hadzi-Vasileva’s latest site-specific installation Fragility fills the former church that now houses Brighton’s Fabrica art gallery with a series of delicate veils. Made of a curious ghostly substance that invites closer inspection, the veils are made of caul fat: a pale, web-like membrane from a pig’s stomach, that fans...
Yoko Ono: One Woman Show, 1960-1971 at Museum of Modern Art

Yoko Ono: One Woman Show, 1960-1971 at Museum of Modern Art

In 1971, Yoko Ono placed a small ad in the Village Voice announcing her unofficial ‘One Woman Show’ at what she called the Museum of Modern [F]art. When visitors arrived however, there was little indication of her work. A sign outside the museum said the artist had released flies on...
Black's: An Ambiguous Space

Black’s: An Ambiguous Space

Black’s, a private member’s club in the heart of Soho that prides itself on being a space for the ‘extraordinarily interesting and interested’. As the antithesis of White’s, Black’s draws a trendier, one could even say, rather more bohemian crowd. The wooden floorboards, gorgeous fireplaces and atmospheric but cramped bar...
Fighting History at Tate Britain

Fighting History at Tate Britain

Tate Britain’s Fighting History Exhibition aims to examine the course of British History Painting, especially when examining issues surrounding war. I think. It’s not entirely clear from the outset. Tate seems to have a knack for ignoring chronology and curating shows by disjointedly jumbling he artworks around the walls in...
Seven Dials presents: Spotlight

Seven Dials presents: Spotlight

A free open-air free art, music and comedy festival in the heart of London on Saturday 15th August. Seven Dials, London’s go to art, fashion, lifestyle and restaurant destination is hosting Spotlight, a free one-day music, arts and comedy festival compered by Radio 1’s Alice Levine, who was seen hosting...
Original Penguin Celebrates Sixty Years With A New Store

Original Penguin Celebrates Sixty Years With A New Store

Original Penguin has a lot to celebrate this year, with some exciting collections and collaborations and a new UK store in their 60th year. A packed party in London’s Shoreditch to toast their diamond year earlier this month made it clear what a diverse and loyal following the brand have,...
Hip Hop Revolution at The Museum of the City of New York

Hip Hop Revolution at The Museum of the City of New York

Riding on New York City’s subway is an evocative experience. Images of classic movies such as The Warriors – a film that depicts gang culture in the city during the economically depressed 1970s, and Beat Street – the 1984 movie about Hip Hop and Graffiti that places the artist as...
Rosenfeld Porcini Gallery -­ Spazio Visivo | Beyond Sight

Rosenfeld Porcini Gallery -­ Spazio Visivo | Beyond Sight

At a time where the world of contemporary art is constantly moving and thus diversifying, new means emerge to both experience and research themes found in art practice. Hence, collaborations such as that of interdisciplinary duo Spazio Visivo are becoming more commonplace. Exciting ventures such as that which has produced...
Matthew Lawrence - Beneath The Surface Of The Day

Matthew Lawrence – Beneath The Surface Of The Day

This weekend the artist Matthew Lawrence lays bare the contents of his head in an intense and evocative first solo show; ‘Beneath The Surface Of The Day’, a show which has been three years in its creation. Held in the industrial warehouse setting of an ex-pencil factory in Seven Sisters,...
Celebrated Artist ZOOBS Explains Why he created his powerful Madonna & Fracked Baby piece

Celebrated Artist ZOOBS Explains Why he created his powerful Madonna & Fracked Baby piece

Los Angeles based artist ZOOBS sat down to talk to Candid about why he created his evocative Madonna & Fracked Child piece recently. The artist’s innovative style blends mixed media to create powerful, thought provoking images that capture life in its most diverse, and sometimes harrowing forms. His evolution as a...
There Will Be Blood Live at the Southbank Centre

There Will Be Blood Live at the Southbank Centre

Talking Head’s co-founder David Byrne is curating a live music and film event at The Southbank Centre in London this August. Byrne has often brought sound and cinema together – he acted in, and directed films, creating the stage design and choreography of Talking Heads’ concert film Stop Making Sense...
Shirley Baker: Women, Children and Loitering Men at The Photographer's Gallery

Shirley Baker: Women, Children and Loitering Men at The Photographer’s Gallery

Shirley Baker was a pioneer of social documentary photography in Britain – especially so for being a woman in a traditionally male profession (unions restricted women working as press photographers until the 1960s). Still not widely known, Baker has finally been given a well-deserved retrospective at The Photographers’ Gallery in...
Bye Bye Balenciaga

Bye Bye Balenciaga

Alexander Wang will leave Balenciaga, the French couture house confirmed this morning. After days and weeks of rumour and speculation about the American designer’s future (or lack of, more specifically) at the brand, a statement to WWD this morning said: “Balenciaga and Alexander Wang today announce their joint decision not...
Eli Reed: A Long Walk Home at the Leica Gallery, Los Angeles

Eli Reed: A Long Walk Home at the Leica Gallery, Los Angeles

One of the more visible problems in America, whether it’s in New York City or on California’s west coast, is the extreme social divide – and no one captures it better than photographer Eli Reed. His recent exhibition, Eli Reed: A Long Walk Home, at the Leica Gallery in Los...
Spin at Magma: A 360° Living Portrait Of A Design Studio

Spin at Magma: A 360° Living Portrait Of A Design Studio

The art bookshop magma is something of an institution – a bastion of print in the digital age; it has always pushed to preserve the physical, even if combined with digital technologies. Founded in Seven Dials in 2000 by two friends who met while working in the failing bookstores of...
Hedi Slimane To Bring Couture Back To Saint Laurent

Hedi Slimane To Bring Couture Back To Saint Laurent

More than a decade after it last showed a couture collection – by the company’s late founding designer – Yves Saint Laurent couture is to return, the house announced today. Guided by creative director Hedi Slimane, a 17th century mansion on Paris’s Left Bank has been chosen to house house...
Bruce Conner: Crossroads, at Thomas Dane Gallery

Bruce Conner: Crossroads, at Thomas Dane Gallery

Bruce Conner’s iconic 1976 film ‘Crossroads’ is presented by Thomas Dane Gallery whose Duke Street space is transformed into a cinematic experience with the projection covering an entire end wall and the soundtrack all-encompassing, immersive. In its 36 minutes duration, the film presents footage of one of the first nuclear...
Oliver Sweeney Celebrate 25 Years With First Fragrance

Oliver Sweeney Celebrate 25 Years With First Fragrance

British shoe maker Oliver Sweeney has found an original way to celebrate its silver anniversary – adding a new string to its bow in doing so – by launching its first fragrance. Completing the menswear offering which over 25 years has incorporated accessories and ready-to-wear to sit alongside the brand’s...
An interview with Ki Price

An interview with Ki Price

Sitting by the fountains on a sunny afternoon at the prestigious Central Saint Martins College, images of the late iconic designer Alexander McQueen, and the many other award-winning designers to have emerged from the university are conjured in the mind. The location is where we meet Vivienne Westwood’s favored photographer,...
Barbers, Butchers and Bourbon

Barbers, Butchers and Bourbon

A butcher and a barber don’t make for the most obvious collaboration (not least given some uncomfortable Sweeney Todd associations), but that’s exactly what happened when Ruffians Barbers partnered with the Wild Game Co. and Bulleit Bourbon for their second ever pop-up supper club. Ruffians’ Covent Garden store serves as...
Birra Moretti Gran Tour – London

Birra Moretti Gran Tour – London

Yesterday saw the launch of the London leg of the Birra Moretti Gran Tour – an authentic Italian food journey that brings 7 different street food vendors showcasing their twists regional specialities together with Birra Moretti. The London part of the tour is housed in the trendy, relaxed, semi-open Courtyard...
The Longhouse, Bali

The Longhouse, Bali

We’re idling at the edge of the infinity pool, which is set into the second floor terrace and overflows into a tropical garden scattered with pink and yellow frangipanis. Up ahead, the hill rolls gently all the way to the brink of Bali’s glinting coastline. We’ve just checked into The Longhouse, a private six-bedroom villa spread over three lavish levels in the Jimbaran hills. Set high on the hillside, The...
Out of the Blue: How Lucky Blue Smith Became Menswear's Biggest Star

Out of the Blue: How Lucky Blue Smith Became Menswear’s Biggest Star

I watched a video that appeared on my Facebook timeline this morning. It was Lucky Blue Smith, the 17-year-old model from Utah, leaving a Milan Fashion Week show. Used to seeing models post-show huddled together outside the venue – smoking, nonchalantly posing for the street style photographers, citymapping their route...
Hugo Boss Is The Latest Luxury Brand To Go Fur-Free

Hugo Boss Is The Latest Luxury Brand To Go Fur-Free

Luxury fashion brand Hugo Boss has pledged to go completely fur-free from its autumn/winter 2016 collections onwards, to be shown in the spring. The pledge was made public in Hugo Boss’s Sustainability Report 2014 published last month and puts the brand in the same ranks as Stella McCartney, Tommy Hilfiger, ASOS, Calvin Klein...
Just What is Apple Music?

Just What is Apple Music?

Today, Apple is entering into the already competitive music streaming market with the launch of Apple Music. Apple Music is quite similar to Spotify, in that it will allow subscribers to access tens of millions of songs on demand over the internet on iOS devices, Macs and PCs initially, and...
Brewhouse & Kitchen, Highbury

Brewhouse & Kitchen, Highbury

The small but growing Brewhouse & Kitchen group looks to fill a spot somewhere between the chain pubs from the likes of Greene King and Wetherspoon’s and the trendy gastropub/microbreweries beginning to appear across the country. With its sixth venue, located enviably on the roundabout outside Highbury & Islington station,...
Is H&M's New Brand Their Next Step To World Domination?

Is H&M’s New Brand Their Next Step To World Domination?

H&M have announced that as soon as 2017 they could be launching a new brand unlike anything in the company’s current portfolio. “It will be completely different from H&M,” CEO Karl-Johan Persson explained in an interview this week, adding, “it won’t be similar to H&M’s sister brands either.” H&M Group’s brands...
Infamous Bar and Restaurant, Nam Long Le Shaker, opens new Opium Den

Infamous Bar and Restaurant, Nam Long Le Shaker, opens new Opium Den

In the heart of Old Brompton road lies one of Chelsea’s most infamous establishments, running for close to three decades. Nam Long Le Shaker is known for its high profile cliental, flamboyant owner and of course ‘Flaming Ferraris’ (a drink that should only be drunk with severe caution). Thai Dang,...
Birra Moretti’s Gran Tour

Birra Moretti’s Gran Tour

This July sees the return of Italian beer brand, Birra Moretti’s Gran Tour. Going off the success of its premier last year, Moretti Gran Tour will kick off the summer in style in Edinburgh, Leeds, and London. The travelling pop-up food and drinks festival will feature authentic regional Italian cuisine...
Afternoon Tea at The Royal Crescent Hotel & Spa, Bath

Afternoon Tea at The Royal Crescent Hotel & Spa, Bath

Ninety minutes after our departure from the turmoil of London, wrapped in the comfort of First Great Western’s first class carriage, we pull into the historic city of Bath. A short drive from the station – or a leisurely stroll through the distinctive stone streets – sits The Royal Crescent...
Michelin-starred Pop-Up in London with S. Pellegrino

Michelin-starred Pop-Up in London with S. Pellegrino

These days it feels like you’re not anyone if you haven’t run your own pop-up restaurant and, with that in mind, luxury Italian mineral water company S. Pellegrino is putting together a two-day pop-up fine dining experience, Live in Italian, Live from London, to bring some of Italy’s finest to the heart...
Girl - Lucian Freud’s Portraits Of His Second Wife

Girl – Lucian Freud’s Portraits Of His Second Wife

  The pale and introvert portraits of the muse that broke Freud’s heart. Lady Caroline Blackwood, despite having suffered a troubled childhood, was the most eligible bachelorette in London and expected to marry affluently. She was introduced to the world of art by Lucian Freud, who she eloped with to...
Barbara Hepworth: Sculpture for a Modern World

Barbara Hepworth: Sculpture for a Modern World

  Coming soon to Tate Britain is a retrospective of sculptures by the world-renowned British artist Dame Barbara Hepworth. The bold simple lines of her abstract sculptures with their harmonious and undulating interactions between positive and negative space are instantly recognisable worldwide.   Long overdue, this is to be the...

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